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Tag: Japanese

Lockheed Martin to support AEGIS system for Japanese self defense forces

Lockheed Martin to support AEGIS system for Japanese self defense forces

Business
Dec. 18 (UPI) -- Lockheed Martin has been awarded a contract for the AEGIS weapon system by the U.S. Navy for new construction in support of Japan's Maritime Self Defense Force.The deal, announced Friday by the Department of Defense, is worth more than $ 135.8 million under the terms of a cost-plus-incentive-fee, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract.The contract calls for new construction and integration of a DDG AEGIS, which is a centralized, automated, command-and-control weapon system used to rapidly detect and track more than 100 targets at once.Work on the contract will occur in several U.S. states, as well locations in Japan, and is expected to be completed in December 2018.The terms of the deal provide cost reimbursement from the U.S. government that would aid Lockheed Martin on potential c...
Two more illustrious Japanese firms admit to falsifying quality data

Two more illustrious Japanese firms admit to falsifying quality data

Finance
AKIO MORITA, co-founder of Sony, liked to recall his first trip to Germany in 1953, when a waiter stuck a small paper parasol in his ice-cream and sneered: “This is from your country.” Like many of his post-war compatriots, Mr Morita was ashamed that Japan was known for shoddy goods. The fierce drive to reverse that reputation resulted in the Deming Prize, a quality-control award named after an American business guru so revered in Japan that he received a medal from the emperor for contributing to its industrial rebirth. All that hard work is under threat.Toray Industries, a textiles and chemicals giant, is the latest pillar of corporate Japan to admit to quality problems. This week a subsidiary said it had faked inspections on reinforcement cords used to strengthen car tyres. Sadayuki Sak
Warship's collision with Japanese tug boat the latest mishap for Navy's 7th Fleet

Warship's collision with Japanese tug boat the latest mishap for Navy's 7th Fleet

World
A U.S. warship collided with a Japanese commercial tug boat in Japan's Sagami Bay on Saturday, marking the fifth time this year that a ship in the U.S. Navy's 7th Fleet in the Pacific has been involved in a crash. The Japanese tug boat lost propulsion and drifted into the USS Benfold during a towing exercise. The U.S. guided-missile destroyer sustained minimal damage, and there were no reported injuries on either vessel, according to a press release from the U.S. Navy's 7th Fleet. The USS Benfold, which is awaiting a full damage assessment, remains at sea under its own power. The incident will be investigated, the 7th Fleet said. Here's a look at previous crashes involving U.S. Navy warships in 2017, including two deadly collisions that left 17 sailors dead: The USS Antietam ran agrou...
Former U.S. Marine admits attack, says he didn't mean to kill Japanese woman

Former U.S. Marine admits attack, says he didn't mean to kill Japanese woman

World
Nov. 16 (UPI) -- Former U.S. Marine Kenneth Franklin Shinzato on Thursday said he attacked and tried to rape a 20-year-old Japanese woman in Okinawa prefecture but did not intend to kill her.He made the admission on the first day of his murder and rape trial in Naha District Court.Shinzato said he planned to knock out Rina Shimabukuro, 20, on April 28, 2016, with a stick and then rape her after he saw her walking in Uruma. He said he panicked when she didn't completely lose consciousness so he took her to a nearby grass field. She was found strangled and stabbed several times, prosecutors said.Prosecutors said Shimabukuro's death was premeditated, though, because Shinzato took with him a large suitcase to dispose of her body. After her death, he allegedly put her in the suitcase, took it t...
Japanese scientists aim to turn ocean wave energy into electricity

Japanese scientists aim to turn ocean wave energy into electricity

Science
Sept. 22 (UPI) -- A team of researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University in Japan want to make the ocean an affordable source of renewable energy.Engineers at OIST have already harnessed the energy of ocean currents using underwater turbines. Now, the group is targeting the kinetic power of waves. The team is preparing to install turbines where the energy of the ocean is most apparent."Particularly in Japan, if you go around the beach you'll find many tetrapods," Tsumoru Shintake, a professor at OIST, said in a news release.Tetrapods are pyramid-like concrete structures designed to dampen the force of incoming waves and protect beaches from erosion.Shintake wants to replace tetrapods with turbines designed to convert wave energy into electricity."Surpr...