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New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

Technology
The nation's newest weather satellite, launched less than three months ago, has a serious cooling problem that could affect the quality of its pictures. The trouble is with the GOES-17 satellite's premier instrument for taking images of hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and other natural calamities, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday. The imager's infrared sensors aren't getting properly cooled. Experts are scrambling to understand what went wrong and how to fix it. Officials expect it will take at least a few months to figure out. "As you can imagine, doing this remotely from 22,000 miles below only looking at the on-orbit data is a challenge," said Steve Volz, head of NOAA's satellite and information service. NOAA stresses that three other GOES s...
The 401(k) dilemma: Keep the plan at your old employer or roll it over to an IRA

The 401(k) dilemma: Keep the plan at your old employer or roll it over to an IRA

Finance
Here's a question for anyone who's about to leave an employer: Are you keeping your money in the retirement plan, or are you taking your savings with you?For companies that provide workplace retirement plans, that's a $ 9.2 trillion question — that's the number of assets held in individual retirement plans as of the end of 2017, according to the Investment Company Institute.These 401(k) record-keepers have a bird's eye view of employees' savings and they are in a prime position to contact plan participants about rolling over their balance into an IRA with them — which may not always work out in favor of departing workers."They will try to take you out of your 401(k) and put you into a suboptimal IRA rollover," said Anthony Isola, a financial advisor at Ritholtz Wealth Management in New Yo
Pain at the pump: Gas prices hit three-year high and are expected to keep rising

Pain at the pump: Gas prices hit three-year high and are expected to keep rising

Finance
Buckle up, America. Gas prices have a hit a level not seen in three years and are expected to continue their upward trajectory.The national average for a gallon of gas reached $ 2.82 this week, a level not seen since summer 2015, according to online gas station database GasBuddy.com.Californians are paying the most: $ 3.61 per gallon. By contrast, Oklahoma has the lowest state average, at about $ 2.50.While gas prices typically head higher every spring due to increased driving demand, the current average is 48 cents more per gallon — an increase of about 20.5 percent — than the $ 2.34 consumers paid a year ago before prices inched downward. For most of summer 2017, the average price hovered around $ 2.30 or trended lower.The summer months will likely bring even higher prices."While it won'
If you hit the $502 million Mega Millions jackpot, here's how to keep it quiet

If you hit the $502 million Mega Millions jackpot, here's how to keep it quiet

Finance
With the Mega Millions jackpot swelling to at least $ 502 million for Friday night's drawing, many ticket holders likely are daydreaming about what they'd do with that kind of money.They also should be thinking about how they would protect their identity if they win big.Experts say it's the most important step to take to protect your sudden wealth. It also isn't always an easy thing to do.While some states allow winners to easily remain anonymous when they collect their winnings, others do not. In some places, you can create a trust to receive the money to avoid your name being attached to the cash, as long as you plan ahead.Whether you can shield your identity or not, you should assemble a team of professionals who are experienced in helping lottery winners. That includes an attorney — th
Temperatures to keep rising in Pacific Northwest, new climate models confirm

Temperatures to keep rising in Pacific Northwest, new climate models confirm

Science
Feb. 23 (UPI) -- No region will be immune to climate change, and new research suggests the Pacific Northwest is no exception.To better predict how climate change will impact the northwest corner of the United States, scientists at Oregon State University and the U.S. Forest Service localized the predictions of 30 "general circulation" climate models.General circulation models produce outputs at scales too large to be applied to small-scale systems, like a regional watershed. But scientists were able to localize the large-scale predictions using a process called "downscaling."During the downscaling process, researchers populated the combined models with weather and atmospheric data collected at research stations throughout the Northwest.Though the predictions feature variability depending o...