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Kids can be 3 feet apart in K-12 schools, CDC says in revised COVID-19 guidelines

Kids can be 3 feet apart in K-12 schools, CDC says in revised COVID-19 guidelines

Health
March 19 (UPI) -- With masks, most children can safely attend school while staying 3 feet apart from each other, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials said in new COVID-19 guidelines published Friday. The revised guidelines drop the social distancing recommendation from 6 feet. Advertisement The new recommendation stipulates that all students, teachers and staff members in elementary schools wear masks to cover their mouths and noses. Similarly, middle and high school students should be at least 3 feet apart in classrooms in which mask use is universal and in communities in which COVID-19 transmission is low, moderate or substantial, the agency said. However, middle school and high school students should maintain social distancing of at least 6 feet in communities in which...
Study: Most kids with neurological impairment take 10 or more medications

Study: Most kids with neurological impairment take 10 or more medications

Health
Dec. 11 (UPI) -- Children with seizure disorders, cerebral palsy and other neurological problems often experience "problematic" symptoms that involve treatment with multiple drugs, raising concern that the medications can cause new issues, a study published Friday by JAMA Network Open found. The analysis of 100 children with severe neurological impairment found that 65% suffered from irritability, 55% had insomnia and 54% experienced pain, the data showed. Advertisement Just over three-quarters of the children in the study took 10 or more prescription medications for their neurological disorders and other symptoms, the researchers said. "In our study, children with severe neurological impairment frequently experienced a multitude of symptoms, such as irritability, pain, insomnia, breathin...
Survey: Front-line health workers, kids, older adults should get COVID-19 vaccine first

Survey: Front-line health workers, kids, older adults should get COVID-19 vaccine first

Health
Sept. 29 (UPI) -- Front-line healthcare workers, children and older adults should receive priority if or when a COVID-19 vaccine is available, according to the result of a survey of U.S. adults published Tuesday by JAMA Network Open. Ninety-two percent of respondents indicated that front-line clinicians treating patients infected with the new coronavirus should be vaccinated first, while 81% said younger people and seniors need to be at or near the top of the list, the data showed. Advertisement Since the start of the pandemic, health workers and older adults have been at increased risk for infection compared to other demographic groups. Although children generally have lower risk, youngsters who are infected face the possibility serious complications, including Kawasaki-like disease. "O...

Two kids, no support system and $167 in unemployment benefits: One single mom’s plight in the age of Covid-19

Finance
Jennifer Haynes, a self-employed chef and single mother living in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., is struggling to make ends meet after unemployment benefits abruptly stopped in July without explanation. Meanwhile, the 42-year-old is the sole provider for twin boys, one of whom has special needs.Jennifer HaynesJennifer Haynes didn't just fall through cracks in the country's social safety net.In her case, it's been more like a chasm.Haynes, 42, a self-employed chef and single mother living in Rancho Cucamonga, California, had been getting $ 167 a week in unemployment benefits and an extra $ 600 a week from the federal government. The aid was enough to catch up on a few months of bills and feed her 11-year-old twin boys.But then the California unemployment office mysteriously stopped sending ben...
Kids’ ‘green’ time reduces adverse effects of ‘screen’ time on behavior, learning

Kids’ ‘green’ time reduces adverse effects of ‘screen’ time on behavior, learning

Health
Sept. 4 (UPI) -- More time spent outdoors -- and less in front of a screen -- leads to improved mental health in children and adolescents, according to an analysis of existing research published Friday by the journal PLOS ONE. Based on data from 186 previously published studies, researchers determined that young people who spent more time on handheld games and devices, television and computers were more likely to have behavior and emotional problems and display symptoms of aggression and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Advertisement The young people also were more likely to have learning or social difficulties. Conversely, children who spent more time outdoors and who had increased access to "green" spaces for play and learning were less likely to have these undesirable traits. ...