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Surfer punches shark to escape attack; 2nd surfer attacked hours later

Surfer punches shark to escape attack; 2nd surfer attacked hours later

World
Two men surfing off the western coast of Australia are lucky to be alive after getting attacked by sharks. Australia’s 9News reported that Jason Longrass, 41, and Alejandro Travaglini, 37, were attacked in two separate incidents less than a mile from each other on Monday in Gracetown. In dramatic video posted on 9News, Travaglini is seen being taken care of by friends before he was flown by helicopter to Perth Royal Hospital for emergency surgery. "He was punching the shark, and, like, there was three attacks, three different attacks in 20 seconds," Mikel Basanies told 9News. The Australian media station reported the Argentinian-born surfer was bit on both legs at just before 8:30 a.m. He was stable after surgery, according to 9News. Just hours later, another attack by what Longrass
Eat These Foods Now for a Sharper Brain Later

Eat These Foods Now for a Sharper Brain Later

Health
Omega-3 fatty acids—DHA in particular—contribute to a healthy brain. “The brain’s membranes use these fats to improve cellular structure and brain signaling, which translates into better cognitive function,” says Vasanti Malik, ScD, a research scientist in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. DHA also quells chronic inflammation that can harm brain cells and lead to cognitive decline.Fish is the top source: Eating fatty fish (like salmon, sardines, mackerel, or trout) once a week can help slow cognitive decline and reduce Alzheimer’s risk, research suggests. You can also get omega-3s from walnuts, chia seeds, flaxseed, and hempseed.Let's block ads! (Why?) Food - Health.com
Twice-dead star explodes 50 years later

Twice-dead star explodes 50 years later

Science
Nov. 8 (UPI) -- It's the star that keeps on dying -- astronomers have discovered a star that's exploded several times over the last half-century.Scientists first noted supernova iPTF14hls in September 2014. The fresh explosion seemed like the average type II-P supernova. The glow of such explosions usually last for 100 days. This supernova remained bright for 600 days.When researchers examined archival observations of this specific spot in the sky, they found a 1954 explosion in the very same location.Apparently, the star suffered a fiery near-death explosion, survived, and then exploded again five decades later."This supernova breaks everything we thought we knew about how they work," Iair Arcavi, an astronomer at the University of California Santa Barbara and Las Cumbres Observatory, sai...
Childhood cancer survivor returns to hospital as nurse more than 20 years later

Childhood cancer survivor returns to hospital as nurse more than 20 years later

Health
This week, Montana Brown started working as a staff nurse in Atlanta, Georgia. It was a dream finally realized for the 24-year-old, two-time childhood cancer survivor from Atlanta. Brown is not just any new nurse at the AFLAC Cancer Center though, she's also a former patient there. Teacher snaps photo of cancer survivor on 1st and last day of school When she was 2 years old, Brown was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare type of childhood cancer of the connective tissue. She underwent chemotherapy for a year at the AFLAC Cancer Center. All the while, she said, her parents tried to help her have a normal life, watching movies while she was in the hospital. By the time, Brown reached high school, she had been active in competitive gymnastics and competitive cheerleading for years. The...
New study links C-sections with hysterectomy complications later in life

New study links C-sections with hysterectomy complications later in life

Health
A new study found that women who undergo a cesarean section delivery may have an increased risk of complications when undergoing a hysterectomy later in life. Women who have undergone one cesarean delivery had a 31.1 percent increased risk of re-operation after a hysterectomy later in life, when compared with women having only vaginal deliveries, according to the study, published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Surgery journal. Meanwhile, women who have had two or more cesarean deliveries may have an even higher risk of a re-operation following a hysterectomy, researchers found. The study comes at a time when approximately one-third of all births in the United States are deliveries by C-section, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and P...