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Tag: leaves

Bumblebees nibble the leaves of flowers to trick them into flowering early

Bumblebees nibble the leaves of flowers to trick them into flowering early

Science
May 21 (UPI) -- When impatient bumblebees emerge in early spring only to find a handful of daffodils, they sometimes resort to hi-jinks. Research published Thursday in the journal Science suggests bumblebees trick flowers into flowering early by nibbling on their leaves. Previous studies have shown plants bloom early in response to environmental stressors like intense heat or light, signs of heatwaves and drought, but the latest research suggests physical damage, like the scars left by a hungry bumblebee vandal, can have similar effects. In lab tests, researchers found bumblebees were more likely to pierce tiny holes in the leaves of black mustard plants after being deprived of pollen for three days, suggesting the vandals are motivated by hunger. The plants with damaged leaves put out f...
Hospital ship USNS Mercy leaves Los Angeles

Hospital ship USNS Mercy leaves Los Angeles

Business
May 15 (UPI) -- The Navy hospital ship USNS Mercy left Los Angeles on Friday after serving as assistance to area hospitals dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. Mercy departed the World Cruise Center Terminal of the Port of Los Angeles for San Diego, its home base, after treating a wide variety of patients. Several surgeries, including the ship's first pacemaker replacement procedure, were performed. The 1,000-bed hospital ship arrived on March 27, not to treat COVID-19 patients but to handle other patient concerns as local hospitals dealt with the virus. The vessel is now expected to return to its home port in San Diego. Over the course of its six weeks in port in Los Angeles, the vessel treated a total of 77 patients, including 36 surgeries overall, USNI reported. "We came to Los Angele...
Surrogate trade exposed as pandemic leaves 51 babies stranded in Kiev hotel

Surrogate trade exposed as pandemic leaves 51 babies stranded in Kiev hotel

World
Dozens of babies are stranded in Ukraine because of the coronavirus pandemic.The babies were born to surrogate mothers in Ukraine and are due to be collected by parents from the US, UK, Europe and elsewhere. But Ukraine, like many countries around the world, has closed its borders to foreigners in an effort to limit the spread of the coronavirus, which has killed more than 300,000 people globally. Image: The babies are shown to their parents only through pictures and video calls Ukraine's borders have been closed to foreigners since March, leaving most of the parents to make do with seeing their babies in pictures and during video calls.The 51 babies lying in rows of cots in a small hotel on the outskirts of Kiev are likely to be wait...
Coronavirus cruise ship finally leaves Australian port

Coronavirus cruise ship finally leaves Australian port

Health
A cruise ship that is the subject of a criminal investigation after it became Australia’s largest single source of coronavirus infections is departing the country's shoresBy ROD McGUIRK Associated PressApril 23, 2020, 10:06 AM4 min read4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleCANBERRA, Australia -- A cruise ship that is the subject of a criminal investigation after it became Australia’s largest single source of coronavirus infections set off from the country's shores Thursday a month after it was ordered by police to leave. The Ruby Princess has been linked to 19 deaths in Australia and two in the United States. Australia has recorded 75 coronavirus deaths. A government inquiry is underway into why 2,700 passengers and crew were allowed to disembark in Sydney on March
Oak leaves contain ‘potential cure’ for citrus greening disease, researchers say

Oak leaves contain ‘potential cure’ for citrus greening disease, researchers say

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., Jan. 29 (UPI) -- Scientists in Florida have confirmed what some citrus growers suspected for years -- that oak trees could inhibit citrus greening disease, which has brought the once-thriving Florida industry to the brink of collapse. Oak leaves represent "the first potential organic cure" for the destructive tree sickness, said Lorenzo Rossi, a University of Florida biologist and co-author of a study published in the January issue of the journal Plant Physiology and Biochemistry. Research over the past year at a University of Florida greenhouse in Fort Pierce showed that citrus trees recovered from citrus greening when sprayed and drenched with treated water twice a week for two months. The water was treated by steeping chopped oak leaves in it overnight, allowing leaf co...