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Worry less about children's screen use, parents told

Worry less about children's screen use, parents told

Health
There is little evidence screen use for children is harmful in itself, guidance from leading paediatricians says.Parents should worry less as long as they have gone through a checklist on the effect of screen time on their child, it says.While the guidance avoids setting screen time limits, it recommends not using them in the hour before bedtime. Experts say it is important that the use of devices does not replace sleep, exercising and time with family. It was informed by a review of evidence published at the same time in the BMJ Open medical journal, and follows a debate around whether youngsters should have time on devices restricted.Meanwhile, a separate study has found that girls are twice as likely to show signs of depressive symptoms linked to soci...
Older adults fall less if they exercise, study says

Older adults fall less if they exercise, study says

Health
Dec. 28 (UPI) -- Exercise may be able to save older adults from taking costly spills, new research says. A study, published Friday in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that in 40 randomized trials exercise significantly decreased the risk of falling or suffering an injury while falling in 21, 868 participants. "Exercise training is an intervention of utmost importance for older adults' health leading to benefits on multiple systems and functions, including muscle and bone health, the cardiometabolic system, as well as physical and potentially cognitive functions," the study read. While exercise didn't decrease the risk of falling multiple times, as well as hospitalization and mortality if they did fall, it's still an important activity for older adults. The Council on Aging says that o...
'I got paid less than my colleagues for doing the same work'

'I got paid less than my colleagues for doing the same work'

Business
Connor McCann works in a BT call centre in Canterbury but despite doing the same role as his colleagues was paid thousands less a year.That's because the 24-year-old was employed by agency Manpower and not BT."It didn't matter how good you are at your job, you're still being paid less than my colleagues," he said.New research finds the 950,000 UK workers employed through an agency, like Mr McCann, earn more than £400 a year less than those employed directly.The Resolution Foundation figure includes wages as well as other benefits such as unclaimed holiday or sick pay, and deductions for uniforms.That's more than the number of people on zero-hours contracts, according to the think-tank. "I was speaking to the exact same customers and selling the exac...
Exposure to pesticides makes bees less social, reduces colony size

Exposure to pesticides makes bees less social, reduces colony size

Science
Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Exposure to pesticides can reduce the size of bee colonies and cause the insect to become less social. Researchers published those findings in the journal Science. A team of researchers, led by Harvard University's James Crall, used a robotic bench that allowed them to study the behavior patterns of as many as a dozen bee colonies at once. They observed that after pesticide exposure, bees spent less time nursing larvae and less time socializing with other bees. They also saw that exposure prevented the bees from building protective wax caps around their colony or warming the nest. "These pesticides first came into use around the mid-1990s, and are now the most commonly-used class of insecticide around the globe," Crall said in a press release. "Typically, they work throug...
Minimally invasive surgery less effective than open surgery for cervical cancer

Minimally invasive surgery less effective than open surgery for cervical cancer

Health
Nov. 1 (UPI) -- Early-stage cervical cancer patients who undergo a minimally invasive hysterectomy have a worse survival outlook than open surgery of the procedure, according to two studies published simultaneously. Researchers "recommend on only using open surgery for cervical cancer" based on the results of the a epidemiologic study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. And researchers examining a phase 3 trial, published in the same issue of the New England Journal of Medicine also support only open surgery. Researchers from Harvard Medical School, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University participated in the studies. "Do these studies signal ...