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Exposure to pesticides makes bees less social, reduces colony size

Exposure to pesticides makes bees less social, reduces colony size

Science
Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Exposure to pesticides can reduce the size of bee colonies and cause the insect to become less social. Researchers published those findings in the journal Science. A team of researchers, led by Harvard University's James Crall, used a robotic bench that allowed them to study the behavior patterns of as many as a dozen bee colonies at once. They observed that after pesticide exposure, bees spent less time nursing larvae and less time socializing with other bees. They also saw that exposure prevented the bees from building protective wax caps around their colony or warming the nest. "These pesticides first came into use around the mid-1990s, and are now the most commonly-used class of insecticide around the globe," Crall said in a press release. "Typically, they work throug...
Minimally invasive surgery less effective than open surgery for cervical cancer

Minimally invasive surgery less effective than open surgery for cervical cancer

Health
Nov. 1 (UPI) -- Early-stage cervical cancer patients who undergo a minimally invasive hysterectomy have a worse survival outlook than open surgery of the procedure, according to two studies published simultaneously. Researchers "recommend on only using open surgery for cervical cancer" based on the results of the a epidemiologic study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. And researchers examining a phase 3 trial, published in the same issue of the New England Journal of Medicine also support only open surgery. Researchers from Harvard Medical School, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University participated in the studies. "Do these studies signal ...
Climate researchers: More green space, less biofuel

Climate researchers: More green space, less biofuel

Science
Sept. 28 (UPI) -- The chorus of biofuel critics is getting louder. In an opinion article published this week in the journal PNAS, a pair climate scientists argued continued support for biofuel production will make it more difficult to protect the climate. John M. DeCicco, a research professor at the University of Michigan Energy Institute, and William H. Schlesinger, president emeritus of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, want to see more conservation of the planet's natural resources. When burned, many low-carbon biofuels have a much smaller impact on the atmosphere than fossil fuels. But the development or conversion of land for the production of biofuel crops can negatively impact the environment. "Current policies advancing bioenergy contribute to the pressure to convert natura...
Pay is '£13 a week less than 10 years ago'

Pay is '£13 a week less than 10 years ago'

Business
Average earnings in the UK are still £13 lower than they were a decade ago, a study has found.Job insecurity is now "widespread", with 800,000 workers on zero-hours contracts, according to the Resolution Foundation, an independent think tank.However, 2.1 million more people have found jobs since the financial crisis in 2008, with 1.2 million of those in the poorest third of households.The foundation said this was "a much-needed bright spark amidst the gloom".Its senior economic analyst, Stephen Clarke, said lower-income families had accounted for the majority of the jobs growth."While employment is at a record high, Britain is still some way off full employment and too much work remains low-paid and insecure," he said."Steps to provide advance notic...
Immigrants cost the health care system less than US-born Americans: Study

Immigrants cost the health care system less than US-born Americans: Study

Health
Slightly over half of Americans — 52 percent — believe that immigrants are a financial burden on the U.S. healthcare system, and two thirds believe that undocumented immigrants should not be eligible for social services provided by state and local governments. A study published Thursday in the International Journal of Health Services finds that immigrants actually use far less healthcare resources than non-immigrants, and may actually subsidize the health care of U.S. citizens. Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Tufts University assessed all peer-reviewed studies since 2000 related to healthcare costs by immigrants in the United States. The authors found that across all age groups, immigrants’ overall healthcare costs were one-half to two-thirds those of people ...