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Tag: level

Price for F-35 drops to lowest level yet with $11.5B contract

Price for F-35 drops to lowest level yet with $11.5B contract

Business
Sept. 28 (UPI) -- With an $ 11.5 billion agreement for the next round of F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter production, Lockheed Martin says the cost for all three variants of the aircraft have reached their lowest levels in the history of the program. The Department of Defense and Lockheed Martin on Friday announced the contract for Low-Rate Initial Production Lot 11, which covers a total of 141 of the aircraft -- 91 for the U.S. military, 28 for F-35 international partners and 22 for foreign military sales customers -- with deliveries expected to start next year. The individual costs for the three U.S. military variants -- $ 89.2 million per F-35A for the Air Force, $ 115.5 million per F-35B for the Marine Corps and $ 107.7 million per F-35C for the Navy -- have declined by 5.4 perc...
Cancer waiting times 'at worst level ever' in England

Cancer waiting times 'at worst level ever' in England

Health
The key cancer target has been missed by a record margin in England, figures show.Patients who are given an urgent referral by their GP are meant to start treatment within 62 days.But in July, 78.2% were seen in that timeframe, the worst performance since records began in October 2009. It means more than 3,000 people waited longer than two months for treatment to begin.The target for the NHS is 85%, which was last hit in December 2015. The target is also being missed elsewhere in the UK.NHS England said there were rising numbers of cancer cases being referred - over the past years there has been a 5% increase alone.The past three months in particular have seen a significant increase in total cases.Planned surgery waitsIt comes as...
Jurassic reptiles were forced to adapt to sea level rise

Jurassic reptiles were forced to adapt to sea level rise

Science
Sept. 4 (UPI) -- New analysis of fossil teeth have offered scientists new insights into the impacts of sea level rise on Jurassic food chains. Sea levels rose considerably over the course of the Jurassic period, the 56 million years between the Triassic and Cretaceous periods. As revealed by the fossil record, some species thrived, while others were pushed to the margins. To better understand the dynamics of this upheaval, scientists studied the shapes and sizes of teeth found among Jurassic strata along the coasts of England. All of the teeth were sourced from marine sediments representing an 18-million-year period when sea levels fluctuated dramatically. The owners of the ancient teeth belonged to a diverse food chain called the Jurassic Sub-Boreal Seaway. The analysis suggests the Jur...
No 'healthy' level of alcohol consumption exists, according to new study

No 'healthy' level of alcohol consumption exists, according to new study

Health
Bad news for the 2.4 billion people around the world who drink alcohol regularly: There is no level of alcohol that is good for health, according to a new study in the journal The Lancet. Using data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study, newer data analysis methods, and a review of previous studies, the researchers calculated the levels of alcohol consumption and the rates of alcohol-related health problems for 195 countries from 1990-2016. According to their estimates, drinking one alcoholic drink per day for one year increases the risk of developing one of the 23 alcohol-related health problems by 0.5 percent. These include cardiovascular disease, different cancers, intentional and unintentional injuries, communicable diseases, and more. Without drinking...
Sea level to increase risk of deadly tsunamis

Sea level to increase risk of deadly tsunamis

Science
Aug. 15 (UPI) -- New research suggests sea level rise caused by manmade global warming is likely to increase the risk of devastating tsunamis. Just 12 inches of sea level, scientists at Virginia Tech found, would put coastal communities in greater danger. Climate change isn't altering the planet's tectonics, so tsunami-generating earthquakes aren't likely to become more frequent. But rising global temperatures are melting Earth's glaciers, accelerating sea level rise, which amplifies the impact of extreme flooding events. When Virginia Tech researchers ran simulations to measure the risk of tsunami-caused flooding, they found sea level rise had a surprisingly large effect. "Our research shows that sea-level rise can significantly increase the tsunami hazard, which means that smaller tsun...