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Tag: Life

Ryugu’s rubble suggests its short life has been rather turbulent

Ryugu’s rubble suggests its short life has been rather turbulent

Science
Sept. 21 (UPI) -- The asteroid Ryugu is a loose assemblage of fragments from a collision between two asteroids, according to new research published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy. Some asteroids are composed of large, solid pieces of rock, but Ryugu is more like a rubble pile than a rock. It is too small and fragile to have remained intact for very long -- scientists estimate Ryugu formed between 10 million to 20 million years ago. Advertisement "Ryugu is too small to have survived the whole 4.6 billion years of solar system history," Seiji Sugita, professor of planetary sciences at the University of Tokyo in Japan, said in a news release. "Ryugu-sized objects would be disrupted by other asteroids within several hundred million years on average." "We think Ryugu spent most of its ...
Madonna to direct and co-write film about her life story

Madonna to direct and co-write film about her life story

Entertainment
Madonna is set to co-write and direct a film about her life and career, Universal Pictures has announced.Madonna has said she wants the film to "convey the incredible journey that life has taken me on as an artist, a musician, a dancer - a human being, trying to make her way in this world". She added: "The focus of this film will always be music. Music has kept me going and art has kept me alive. Image: This will be the third film Madonna has directed, following 2008's Filth and Wisdom, and 2011's WE "There are so many untold and inspiring stories and who better to tell it than me. It's essential to share the roller coaster ride of my life with my voice and vision."The pop icon will be co-writing the film with Diablo Cody, the Oscar-w...
Is there life floating in the clouds of Venus?

Is there life floating in the clouds of Venus?

Science
It's an extraordinary possibility - the idea that living organisms are floating in the clouds of Planet Venus.But this is what astronomers are now considering after detecting a gas in the atmosphere they can't explain.That gas is phosphine - a molecule made up of one phosphorus atom and three hydrogen atoms.On Earth, phosphine is associated with life, with microbes living in the guts of animals like penguins, or in oxygen-poor environments such as swamps.For sure, you can make it industrially, but there are no factories on Venus; and there are certainly no penguins.So why is this gas there, 50km up from the planet's surface? Prof Jane Greaves, from Cardiff University, UK and colleagues are asking just this question.They've publis...
Northrop’s ‘life extension’ spacecraft heads to the rescue

Northrop’s ‘life extension’ spacecraft heads to the rescue

Science
Sept. 11 (UPI) -- A second spacecraft designed by Northrop Grumman to extend the life of satellites in orbit is headed toward a rescue some 22,200 miles above Earth. The spacecraft is part of Northrop's new in-orbit services. Analysts and observers predict such services will grow into a multibillion-dollar market over the next 10 years. Advertisement Northrop is the first commercial service to enable private space companies to extend the life of large, expensive satellites past their life expectancy as designed. "Satellite operators have few options when a satellite is aging, and they are all expensive [options]," said Joe Anderson, a vice president with Northrop subsidiary SpaceLogistics based in Dulles, Va. The company's rescue satellite, Mission Extension Vehicle-2, or MEV-2, was laun...
Beirut explosion: ‘No signs of life’ after hopes raised in rubble of Lebanon

Beirut explosion: ‘No signs of life’ after hopes raised in rubble of Lebanon

World
No signs of life have been found in the rubble of a building in Beirut, despite earlier hopes that a survivor could be found.The search began on Thursday afternoon after a sniffer dog detected something in the Gemmayze area of the Lebanese capital. Audio detection equipment had detected a pulse of 18 to 19 beats per minute, sparking hope someone could be alive. Lebanese engineer Riyad al Asaad says all 3 ceilings & the stairwell are cleared and all that’s left is to clear rubble on the pavement but have not found any body. Expects to clear everything tonight or tomorrow morning. #Beirut pic.twitter.com/66hXC1xKjE— Zein Ja'far (@skyzein) September 5, 2020 However, on Friday morning, it was reported that the signal had decreased to seven.Rescue