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Tag: light

Light powers faster 3D printing

Light powers faster 3D printing

Science
Jan. 11 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed a new technique for faster, more efficient 3D printing. Instead of building objects layer by layer, the new method uses light to solidify 3D shapes from a vat of liquid. Traditional 3D printing methods don't make sense for small-batch manufacturing jobs with a quick turnaround time. The new technique, which uses a pair of light beams to control which bits of liquid resin become solidified and which remain in fluid form, could allow manufacturers to turn around small batch projects in a couple of weeks. Whereas traditional 3D printers build three dimensional objects using additive techniques, combining 1D lines or 2D cross sections, bit by bit, the new device relies on a phase change to build a 3D object with a single shot. "It's one of the first...
Faint light in Hubble image helps astronomers map dark matter

Faint light in Hubble image helps astronomers map dark matter

Science
Dec. 20 (UPI) -- Scientists have yet to directly detect dark matter, and they don't know what dark matter actually is. But dark matter's presence and influence is reflected in the patterns and movement of light. Using data collected by NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have developed a new way to "see" dark matter via distant starlight. "We have found that very faint light in galaxy clusters, the intracluster light, maps how dark matter is distributed," Mireia Montes, researcher at the University of New South Wales, said in a news release. Intracluster light is the light produced by stars ripped from their homes by the gravity of nearby galaxies. According to Montes and her colleagues, once freed from the gravity of their home galaxy, the roaming stars congregate near concentra...
Artificial light could bring on insomnia in older adults

Artificial light could bring on insomnia in older adults

Health
Nov. 30 (UPI) -- Brightness from outdoor light sources at night is causing insomnia among older adults, a study says. The study findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, showed that "light pollution," or inappropriate or excessive use of artificial, outdoor light at night, can create an unusual and unhealthy effect on humans. "This study observed a significant association between the intensity of outdoor, artificial, nighttime lighting and the prevalence of insomnia as indicated by hypnotic agent prescriptions for older adults in South Korea," said Kyoung-bok Min, an associate professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Seoul National University College of Medicine, said in a press release. Researchers pulled information from the National...
Light pollution inspires boldness in fish

Light pollution inspires boldness in fish

Science
Sept. 21 (UPI) -- Researchers in Germany found fish exposed to artificial light during the night were bolder during the day. In the lab, light pollution caused the test fish, guppies, to be more active at night. The artificial light also cause fish to emerge from their hiding places more quickly during the daytime. The fish didn't become slower or lazier as a result of the increase in nighttime activity. Researchers found the guppies' swimming speed and social behavior was unaltered by light pollution. A number of studies have documented the impacts of light pollution on animals and their ecosystems. The allure of a big city's bright lights can alter a bird's migration pattern. Light pollution can also interfere with coral's ability to spawn. For the experiment, scientists exposed three ...
Copper nanoparticles, green laser light cost beneficial in circuitry printing

Copper nanoparticles, green laser light cost beneficial in circuitry printing

Science
Sept. 13 (UPI) -- Printing electronic circuitry with copper nanoparticle ink and green laser light can be more cost beneficial and efficient, according to a study. Researchers at Soonchunhyang University in South Korea studied the thin-film printing technique instead of the conventional methods, based on laser power, scanning speed, pre-baking conditions and film thickness effects. Their findings were published this week in the journal AIP Advances. Nanoparticles in metallic inks have an advantage over bulk metals because of their lower melting points in the circuitry manufacturing. Originally the researchers, led by Kye-Si Kwon, tested silver nanoparticle ink but found it is costlier. Then, they studied studied copper, which is derived from copper oxide. Although copper's melting point ...