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Tag: light

Light pollution inspires boldness in fish

Light pollution inspires boldness in fish

Science
Sept. 21 (UPI) -- Researchers in Germany found fish exposed to artificial light during the night were bolder during the day. In the lab, light pollution caused the test fish, guppies, to be more active at night. The artificial light also cause fish to emerge from their hiding places more quickly during the daytime. The fish didn't become slower or lazier as a result of the increase in nighttime activity. Researchers found the guppies' swimming speed and social behavior was unaltered by light pollution. A number of studies have documented the impacts of light pollution on animals and their ecosystems. The allure of a big city's bright lights can alter a bird's migration pattern. Light pollution can also interfere with coral's ability to spawn. For the experiment, scientists exposed three ...
Copper nanoparticles, green laser light cost beneficial in circuitry printing

Copper nanoparticles, green laser light cost beneficial in circuitry printing

Science
Sept. 13 (UPI) -- Printing electronic circuitry with copper nanoparticle ink and green laser light can be more cost beneficial and efficient, according to a study. Researchers at Soonchunhyang University in South Korea studied the thin-film printing technique instead of the conventional methods, based on laser power, scanning speed, pre-baking conditions and film thickness effects. Their findings were published this week in the journal AIP Advances. Nanoparticles in metallic inks have an advantage over bulk metals because of their lower melting points in the circuitry manufacturing. Originally the researchers, led by Kye-Si Kwon, tested silver nanoparticle ink but found it is costlier. Then, they studied studied copper, which is derived from copper oxide. Although copper's melting point ...
Anglo Saxon baby teeth could shed light on obesity, diabetes

Anglo Saxon baby teeth could shed light on obesity, diabetes

Science
Sept. 6 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed a new method for measuring the health and development of moms and babies long after they're gone. According to new research, the measure of dentine in the milk teeth, or baby teeth, can serve as a reliable indicator of health among early human populations. For the study, scientists analyzed the baby teeth of more than 1,000 Anglo Saxon children living among the Raunds Furnells settlements. Archaeologists believe the population was under nourished. By comparing the teeth of children who survived the first 1,000 days from conception with those who did not, scientists were able to identify biomarkers that might predict positive and negative health outcomes. Researchers have traditionally relied on bones to study the health of earlier human populati...
Liverpool 3-1 Torino: Reds finish pre-season campaign by making light work of Serie A side

Liverpool 3-1 Torino: Reds finish pre-season campaign by making light work of Serie A side

Sports
LOOKING GOOD Goals from Roberto Firmino, Georginio Wijnaldum and Daniel Sturridge helped Jurgen Klopp's men past Torino Liverpool rounded off their productive pre-season campaign with a satisfying 3-1 victory over Torino at Anfield. It spells the end of a summer which has seen Jurgen Klopp’s men record some impressive victories including a 4-1 triumph over Manchester United as well as a 5-0 demolition job of Serie A giants Napoli. Daniel Sturridge got himself on the scoresheet to continue his impressive pre-season The Reds, who were playing their first match at their home ground for the first time in almost three months started well and won a penalty when Sadio Mane was upended by Gleison Bremer. However, Fabinho, a penalty-taking speci...
The Industrial Revolution could shed light on modern productivity

The Industrial Revolution could shed light on modern productivity

Finance
HOW much yarn per day could an 18th-century British woman spin? Such questions are catnip for economic historians, whose debates typically unfold unnoticed by anyone outside their field. But a running debate concerning the productivity of pre-industrial spinners, and related questions, is spilling beyond academia. Each probably produced between a quarter of a pound and a pound of yarn a day, the historians have concluded. But at issue is something much more profound: a disagreement regarding the nature of technological progress that has important implications for the world economy.Economic growth of the sort familiar today is a staggering departure from the pattern of pre-industrial human history. More than a century of study has not resolved the question of why it began where and when it ...