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Tag: likely

City growth favours animals ‘more likely to carry disease’

City growth favours animals ‘more likely to carry disease’

Science
Turning wild spaces into farmland and cities has created more opportunities for animal diseases to cross into humans, scientists have warned.Our transformation of the natural landscape drives out many wild animals, but favours species more likely to carry diseases, a study suggests.The work adds to growing evidence that exploitation of nature fuels pandemics.Scientists estimate that three out of every four new emerging infectious diseases come from animals. The study shows that, worldwide, we have shaped the landscape in a way that has favoured species that are more likely to carry infectious diseases. And when we convert natural habitats to farms, pastures and urban spaces, we inadvertently increase the probability of pathogens ...
How COVID-19 changed countries and continents – and what the future is likely to hold

How COVID-19 changed countries and continents – and what the future is likely to hold

World
COVID-19 has infected millions around the world since emerging in China late last year, claiming the lives of more than 660,000 people and changing our way of life for some time to come.Now, fears of a second wave of coronavirus are growing in many nations. Here, Sky News' foreign correspondents across Asia, the US, Europe, Russia and India reveal how the virus has changed these continents and countries - and what is likely to happen there in the coming months.Tom Cheshire, Asia correspondentChina was ground zero for COVID-19 back in late 2019. Back then it was a mystery virus. ...

UN agency: North Europe radiation likely linked to reactor

Technology
The U.N. nuclear agency says that slightly elevated levels of radioactivity detected in northern Europe likely were related to a nuclear reactor that was either operating or undergoing maintenance, but it’s still unclear where it is locatedByThe Associated PressJuly 3, 2020, 1:30 PM2 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleBERLIN -- The U.N. nuclear agency said Friday that slightly elevated levels of radioactivity detected in northern Europe likely were related to a nuclear reactor that was either operating or undergoing maintenance, but it's still unclear where it is located. Estonia, Finland and Sweden last week measured higher-than-usual levels of ruthenium and caesium isotopes and detected some other artificial radionuclides. They said nothing on their territory had
Bosses who deny gender bias are more likely to practice gender bias

Bosses who deny gender bias are more likely to practice gender bias

World
June 26 (UPI) -- Bosses that deny the problem of discrimination in the workplace are more likely to practice gender bias themselves, according to a study published Friday in Science Advances. The new research suggests that gender bias is built into the foundations of a career path, researchers say. Advertisement Even if a manager claims to treat an employee based on their competence alone, the study proves the competence and performance evaluations that many managers rely on are biased themselves, they said. "To be clear, it isn't a small fraction of managers who hold this belief," Christopher Begeny, a postdoctoral research fellow in the psychology department at the University of Exeter in Britain, told UPI in an email. "In our study, this was actually the most common belief that manage...
Coronavirus: South Asian people most likely to die in hospital

Coronavirus: South Asian people most likely to die in hospital

Health
South Asian people are the most likely to die from coronavirus after being admitted to hospital in Great Britain, major analysis shows. It is the only ethnic group to have a raised risk of death in hospital and is partly due to high levels of diabetes. The study is hugely significant as it assessed data from four-in-10 of all hospital patients with Covid-19.The researchers said policies such as protecting people at work and who gets a vaccine may now need to change.Twenty-seven institutions across the UK, including universities and public health bodies, as well as 260 hospitals, were involved in the study.The findings have been made public online ahead of being formally published in a medical journal. However, the results were p...