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Tag: likely

Asthma: Young people in the UK 'more likely to die'

Asthma: Young people in the UK 'more likely to die'

Health
Young people in the UK are more likely to die from asthma than those in other wealthy countries, a report has found.Death rates for asthma in 10 to 24-year-olds was highest in the UK among all 14 European nations included in an analysis of 19 high-income countries.The UK also had the highest obesity rates for 15 to 19-year-olds among the European nations.The government said it had "world-leading plans" to safeguard child health.Overall, the report found the UK to be lagging behind other nations across a number of health indicators.The study, from the Nuffield Trust think tank and and the Association for Young People's Health, analysed 17 measures of health and wellbeing for 10 to 24-year-olds in countries that included Germany, France and Italy, as well a...
EPFO likely to retain interest rate at 8.55% for FY19

EPFO likely to retain interest rate at 8.55% for FY19

Finance
New Delhi: Retirement fund body EPFO is likely to retain the interest rate on employees' provident fund at 8.55 per cent rate for the 2018-19 fiscal for its more than six crore subscribers, a highly-placed source said. "The proposal for providing interest rate for the current fiscal would come up in the meeting of the trustees of Employees' Provident Fund Organisation on February 21," the source said. "The interest rate would be retained at 8.55 per cent for the current fiscal as provided in 2017-18 in view of forthcoming Lok Sabha elections. The EPFO's income projections for the current fiscal would be tabled in the meeting." However, the source did not dismissed completely speculations that interest rate on EPF deposits for this fiscal can be more than 8.55 per cent in view of Lok Sabha ...
Solitary corals more likely survive in a warmer ocean

Solitary corals more likely survive in a warmer ocean

Science
Feb. 1 (UPI) -- Corals that prefer isolation to life on a reef are more likely to survive as oceans warm and become more acidic, according to a new study published in the journal Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology. Numerous studies have documented the negative impact global warming is already having on coral around the globe. As oceans warm and marine heatwaves become more frequent and long-lasting, more and more corals are experiencing bleaching events. Both heat stress and rising ocean acidity render corals less able to defend against disease and hungry predators. But as previous studies have shown, some corals are better able to adapt than others. New research out of the University of Texas at Austin suggests more reclusive corals, which prefer to anchor themselves from their relati...
Minority hospitals less likely to give end of life relief, study says

Minority hospitals less likely to give end of life relief, study says

Health
Feb. 1 (UPI) -- Hospitals that primarily serve people of color are less likely to provide relief from the stress of a serious illness, regardless of the person's race, a new study says. Only about 22 percent of white patients with metastatic cancer received palliative care, according to research published Friday in JAMA Network Open. "We knew that black and Hispanic cancer patients receive palliative care at lower rates than white patients, but until now, we didn't know why. Was it just that doctors were not offering these services to their black and Hispanic patients? Or is there some other factor at play?" said Alexander Cole, a researcher at the Center for Surgery and Public Health at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, in a news release. Overall, the study included more than 600,000 ind...
FDA: Irbesartan lots recalled over likely carcinogen

FDA: Irbesartan lots recalled over likely carcinogen

Health
Jan. 19 (UPI) -- A drug company has recalled more irbesartan blood pressure medication after discovering a potential human carcinogen. Prinston Pharmaceutical, doing business as Solco Healthcare, has voluntarily recalled of eight more lots of irbesartan blood pressure medication after detecting trace amounts of impurity in an active pharmaceutical ingredient, the Food and Drug Administration announced Friday. The ingredient in question contains N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), "a substance that occurs nationally in certain foods, drinking water, air pollution, and industrial processes" and has been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a probable human carcinogen. NDEA was manufactured by a factory in China called Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceuticals, which has been lin...