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Tag: likely

Antartica hit 65 degrees, likely breaking heat record

Antartica hit 65 degrees, likely breaking heat record

Technology
It appears Antarctica has broken a heat recordBy CHRISTINA LARSON AP Science WriterFebruary 7, 2020, 10:54 PM2 min readWASHINGTON -- The temperature in northern Antarctica hit nearly 65 degrees (18.3 degrees Celsius), a likely heat record on the continent best known for snow, ice and penguins. The reading was taken Thursday at an Argentine research base and still needs to be verified by the World Meteorological Organization. “Everything we have seen thus far indicates a likely legitimate record," Randall Cerveny, who researches records for the organization, said in a statement. He added that he is waiting for full data to confirm. The research base, called Esperanza, sits on a peninsula that juts up toward the southern tip of South America. The peninsula has warmed significan
Teens who use joints, bongs, concentrates more likely to keep using pot

Teens who use joints, bongs, concentrates more likely to keep using pot

Health
Jan. 24 (UPI) -- Teens who smoke cannabis with joints or bongs, or who use some pot concentrates, are six times more likely to continue using the drug than those who consume it via other methods, a new analysis suggests. In results published Friday by JAMA Network Open, researchers found in a survey of nearly 3,000 teens, the highest percentage -- approximately 6 percent -- reported prior use of "combustible cannabis," while less than 1 percent said they had "vaped" the substance. Teens who said they smoked marijuana in a joint or bong were found to be at higher risk for still smoking six and 12-months later, the authors found. Researchers write in the study that, for cannabis control and efforts to keep it out of the hands of teens, officials should consider targeting pot products that ...
Without sea ice, Arctic permafrost more likely to thaw

Without sea ice, Arctic permafrost more likely to thaw

Science
Jan. 8 (UPI) -- As the Arctic loses its sea ice, new research suggests permafrost is more likely to thaw and release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. As its name implies, permafrost is ground that remains frozen for long periods of time, allowing it to store significant amounts of carbon indefinitely. When permafrost melts, carbon is able to escape into the atmosphere. Because of its role in the carbon cycle, it's important for climate scientists to understand how permafrost is likely to respond to climate change, but predicting the fate of permafrost using modern observations alone is problematic. To develop more accurate prediction models, scientists set out to study the long-term relationships between permafrost melting, temperature and sea ice stability. "We were surprised to fin...
Chinese state ‘likely’ linked to cyber spies targeting human rights workers

Chinese state ‘likely’ linked to cyber spies targeting human rights workers

Technology
By Alexander J Martin, technology reporter, Deborah Haynes, foreign affairs editor A cyber spy group "likely" linked to the Chinese state has targeted human rights campaigners working on issues about the country for up to five years, a new report claims.The espionage group, dubbed Bronze President, deployed malware against its alleged victims to monitor their activities and steal documents, according to the assessment released on Sunday by Secureworks, a US-based cyber security company. One of the alleged targets is understood to be a human rights group that has raised concerns about the treatment of hundreds of thousands of Uighur and other Muslim minorities in China. It has also written about pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong. ...
Chimpanzees likely to share tools, teach skills when task is more complex

Chimpanzees likely to share tools, teach skills when task is more complex

Science
Dec. 27 (UPI) -- New research suggests that when chimpanzees are performing more complex tasks, they are more likely to share tools with their more novice peers and offspring, as well as engage in teaching behaviors. Scientists have previously noted that tool-sharing among chimpanzees represented a form of teaching, but that chimps learn primarily through watching and mimicking -- not via direct teaching. "Non-human primates are often thought to learn tool skills by watching others and practicing on their own, with little direct help from mothers or other expert tool users," Stephanie Musgrave, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Miami, said in a news release. "In contrast, the results from this research indicate that social learning may vary in relation to how chall...