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Jose Mourinho says Christian Eriksen can leave Tottenham with pride amid January transfer links to Inter Milan

Jose Mourinho says Christian Eriksen can leave Tottenham with pride amid January transfer links to Inter Milan

Sports
Jose Mourinho has said Christian Eriksen can leave Tottenham with his head held high, amid reports of a January transfer to Internazionale. The boss has backed Danish ace Eriksen after he received boos from supporters in recent games, and insisted the playmaker has ‘given everything’ for Spurs. Getty Images - Getty Eriksen looked like he was saying his farewells at the end of Spurs’ defeat to Liverpool The Denmark international’s career in north London is set to come to an end when his contract expires in the summer, although he could depart this month if a club are willing to cough up some cash. And reports in Italy suggest Eriksen has agreed a deal to join Inter in the January transfer window, rather than wait until the end of the season. That coul
Study links diabetes to increased risk for heart failure

Study links diabetes to increased risk for heart failure

Health
Jan. 2 (UPI) -- As if diabetes didn't present enough health complications on its own, researchers at the Mayo Clinic now believe those with the disease are at increased risk for heart failure. In findings published Thursday in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers identified diabetes as an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure. In the population study, the risk for heart failure was nearly twice as high in people with the disease compared with healthy controls. "Diabetes mellitus alone is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure," study senior author Horng Chen, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said in a press release. "There is still much to learn and study in terms of this association and how to best dia...
Study links environmental pollution exposure to reduced fetal size

Study links environmental pollution exposure to reduced fetal size

Health
Dec. 30 (UPI) -- Pregnant women may be unknowingly placing their unborn children at risk through exposure to a certain type of pollutants, a study published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics has found. Research led by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and based on ultrasound scans suggests pregnant women exposed to higher levels of persistent organic pollutants, or POPs, had slightly smaller fetuses than women who weren't exposed to the chemicals. The results indicate that the chemicals, which are no longer produced in the United States but remain in the environment, may have lasting health effects even at reduced levels. "The differences we found in fetal growth measures may be more sensitive indicators, compared to birth size, of the potential effects of these compounds," co-...
Study links military suicides with longer wars, but not combat time

Study links military suicides with longer wars, but not combat time

Business
Dec. 13 (UPI) -- Suicides among active-duty members of the military appear to decline during combat -- but may also be more common during longer wars. Researchers from the University of Hawaii and the Department of Defense analyzed nearly 200 years of military records to discern trends in self-inflicted deaths for the most comprehensive analysis of military suicides to date. The study was published in JAMA Network Open on Friday. They found that the incidence of suicide appears to have gone down among active-duty personnel during active wars, particularly during the 20th century. But the numbers increased during longer wars in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. The rate of active-duty suicides has hovered in the range between 20.2 to 29.7 deaths per 100,000 soldiers since 2008, but have rise...
Study links parental use of marijuana to abuse of drugs by children

Study links parental use of marijuana to abuse of drugs by children

Health
Nov. 22 (UPI) -- Roughly one in 10 parents in the United States uses marijuana -- and partaking in the drug increases the risk that their kids may later abuse substances, a new study suggests. In results published Friday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers from Harvard Medical School, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute on Drug Abuse noted that approximately 8 percent of mothers with adolescent or young adult children living at home have used marijuana within the past year, while more than 9 percent of fathers had done so. Their children were nearly 50 percent more likely to use the drug themselves compared to those living in marijuana-free homes. "Parent use of marijuana is rising, and several fathers have confided i...