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Tag: Lion

Lion poacher eaten by lions in South Africa

Lion poacher eaten by lions in South Africa

World
Feb. 13 (UPI) -- A pride of lions attacked and ate a suspected lion poacher in South Africa, police said Monday.The mostly-eaten body of the man was found in the Ingwelala Private Nature Reserve over the weekend. The identity of the man has not been determined, but police found a hunting rifle near his remains, leading them to believe he was a poacher."We are still trying all other means, including the Home Affairs Department, to get his history, which may lead us to his residential place," said Police Lieutenant-Colonel Moatshe Ngoepe, according to Sowetan Live.He added: "The process of identifying the deceased has already commenced and it might be made possible by the fact that his head is amongst the remains that were found at the scene."According to the BBC, lion body parts body parts ...
How to escape from a lion or cheetah – the science

How to escape from a lion or cheetah – the science

Science
The antelope can never out-run the cheetah, but it can survive the chase if it twists and turns sharply at the last minute.That's the finding of a study that tracks the dance of death between the fastest land animal and its prey.Researchers have been analysing how zebra and antelope escape from lions and cheetahs on the African savannah.They say hunting at lower speed favours prey, as it offers them the best chance of out-manoeuvring the predator."In the final stages of a hunt, it isn't about high speed," said Alan Wilson of the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, UK."If the prey tries to run away at speed, it is a very bad move because the predator is faster and can accelerate more quickly, so that plays into the predator's hands. "The optimum tactics of the prey is to run rel...
'Unique:' Lion seen nursing leopard cub in Tanzania

'Unique:' Lion seen nursing leopard cub in Tanzania

Technology
Newly released photographs from a Tanzanian wildlife area show a rare sight: a leopard cub suckling on a lion. The 5-year-old lion lies unperturbed as the small leopard, estimated to be a few weeks old, nurses in the photographs taken Tuesday by a guest at a lodge in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, a United Nations World Heritage site. "To observe a thing like this is very unusual," said Ingela Jansson, head of the KopeLion conservation group, which seeks to resolve conflict between lions and local residents who hunt the predators in order to protect their livestock. The lactating lion, fitted with a GPS collar so that researchers can track her, may have lost her own cubs and therefore was open to feeding the leopard cub, Jansson said. The leopard, meanwhile, appeared to have lost conta...