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Tag: longterm

Long-term air pollution exposure may increase dementia risk by 50%

Long-term air pollution exposure may increase dementia risk by 50%

Health
March 30 (UPI) -- Long-term exposure to air pollution may increase a person's risk for developing dementia, an analysis published Monday by JAMA Neurology has found. In nearly 3,000 older adults in Stockholm, Sweden, researchers found the risk for declines in memory, language, problem-solving and other thinking skills dropped by as much as 50 percent for every five years of exposure to pollution, based on levels of particulate matter and nitrogen oxide in the air near their place of residence. The air pollution-linked risk for dementia was even higher among those with a history of heart failure and ischemic heart disease, or stroke, the authors found. "Air pollution has well-established repercussions on humans' health, in particular for what concern pulmonary diseases and cardiovascular ...
California parents face possible long-term homeschooling

California parents face possible long-term homeschooling

Health
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Extraordinary restrictions on everyday activities expanded to more areas of California on Wednesday as many parents around the state struggled to fathom the prospect put forth by Gov. Gavin Newsom of schools staying closed until summer. David De Leon, whose son is an 8th-grader in Santa Ana, said he was shocked by the announcement, which would mean that so-called distance learning would be required for the rest of the school year. “I don’t know if it’s viable,” De Leon said. “To throw it out for everyone to use until the end of the school year I think is unreasonable.” In Los Angeles, Filiberto Gonzalez, 45, said his three children have been in touch daily with their teachers and have an hour to four hours per day of work they can do on an existing online platform t
Long-term care insurance costs are way up. How advisors can help clients cope

Long-term care insurance costs are way up. How advisors can help clients cope

Finance
Westend61 | Westend61 | Getty ImagesChad Chubb, a certified financial planner, walked a 66-year-old client through four premium increases on her long-term-care insurance policy.In all, the retiree, who is single, has seen her annual premiums rise by more than 60% over the last six years. Her cost in 2018 was $ 2,721, up from $ 1,626 in 2013.Expenses notwithstanding, she's planning on keeping her policy, which she originally purchased in 2005."I understand that the price she pays today for the quality of policy she has is still excellent," said Chubb, founder of WealthKeel in Philadelphia."But that doesn't take away from how these types of increases can and will catch older individuals off guard," he said. "Especially if they are on a fixed income."Chubb's client isn't the only one getting ...
Study: 1 in 5 elderly people in long-term care dies in 5 years

Study: 1 in 5 elderly people in long-term care dies in 5 years

Health
Aug. 26 (UPI) -- Long-term acute care hospitals are supposed to restore independence in people who are have a variety of illnesses, but a new study suggests that for most that isn't the case. Fewer than 1-in-5 older adults treated at long-term facilities live beyond five years, according to research published Monday in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. And those who do survive often go on to develop cancer or other deadly conditions. "Understanding the clinical course after long-term acute care hospitals admission can inform goals of care discussions, planning for care at the end of life and prioritizing health care needs," lead author Anil Makam, a researcher at the University of California at San Francisco and study lead author, said in a news release. "It also may lead s...
‘Earnings could be volatile,’ long-term market bull warns

‘Earnings could be volatile,’ long-term market bull warns

Finance
An earnings season that delivers will play an integral role in whether the market can maintain all-time highs, according to Crossmark Global Investments' Victoria Fernandez.The chief market strategist believes Wall Street is completely discounting second earnings expectations right now, and that leaves little room for disappointments when the season kicks off this Monday. "Earnings could be volatile," she said Friday on CNBC's "Trading Nation. "But according to Fernandez, a long-term bull, a setback would likely be short-lived. "We do think that the trend will be higher in the markets," she said. "[Investors] feel like the Fed has their back, and so the markets are continuing to run on that."On Friday, the major indexes saw all-time intraday highs and fresh record closes. Since the be...