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Tag: loss

Disney star turned wild child Emma Ridley kickstarts weight loss journey for wedding no4

Disney star turned wild child Emma Ridley kickstarts weight loss journey for wedding no4

Entertainment
Before the internet, Insta and selfies, Britain had its very own Kim Kardashian socialite who ruled the roost in the 80s, 90s and noughties.Her name was Emma Ridley and she's still just as wild as ever.Squeezing her curves into a pair of bright pink leggings and plunging low-cut top, the 45-year-old Return to Oz star was spotted out in LA working up a sweat alongside her Belarusian trainer and Dancing with the Stars pro, Dzianis Marsian.The busty blonde looked hard at work as she was put through her paces for the gruelling workout in Studio City, just days after vowing to shed 30lbs after piling on the weight in recent years.Despite being renowned for her rebellious nature and partying ways – which saw her smoke marijuana at just 11-years-old and elope to Las Vegas at age 15 to marry...
Loss of receptor cells can prompt strong itching from a light touch: Study

Loss of receptor cells can prompt strong itching from a light touch: Study

Health
May 4 (UPI) -- A severe reaction to light touching -- often among old people -- occurs because of fewer receptors in the skin, according to a new study with mice.Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis studied severe itching from light tough, even when the skin is under clothing. Their findings, which researchers hope will lead to a treatment for the condition, were published Friday in the journal Science."Itching caused by touch becomes more common as we age and is especially problematic for people with dry skin or who already suffer from chronic itching," senior investigator Dr. Hongzhen Hu, an associate professor of anesthesiology at Washington University, said in a press release. "It can be more than a nuisance, and there are no drugs available to treat thi...
Unintended weight loss identified as second highest cancer risk factor

Unintended weight loss identified as second highest cancer risk factor

Health
April 10 (UPI) -- When a person experiences an unintended weight loss, it is the second-highest predictor for some forms of cancer, according to an analysis of studies.Researchers at the universities of Oxford and Exeter analyzed the findings of 25 studies, incorporating data from more than 11.5 million patients collected between 1994 and 2015. They found that weight loss was linked with 10 types of cancer: prostate, colorectal, lung, gastro-esophageal, pancreatic, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, ovarian, myeloma, renal tract and biliary tree.Their analysis was published Monday in the British Journal of General Practice.Unintended weight loss in people older than 60 exceeded the 3 percent risk threshold for urgent investigation, according to guidelines by Britain's National Institute for Health Re...
Freezing the 'hunger nerve' could help with weight loss

Freezing the 'hunger nerve' could help with weight loss

Health
Weight loss can sometimes seem impossible because even after hard-won success, the pounds can creep back. “Ninety-five percent of people who embark on a diet on their own will fail or gain their weight back at the six- or 12-month mark,” Dr. David Prologo, an interventional radiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, said in a news release video. “The reason for this is the body’s backlash to the calorie restriction." Prologo recently conducted a trial that looked deeper into the issue, targeting the "hunger nerve" and its possible connection to one's ability to lose weight and keep it off. The “hunger nerve” -- also known as the posterior vagal trunk -- is a branch of the larger vagus nerve that works on the heart, lungs and GI system. When your stomach is empty, th
Brain imaging shows memory loss differs by age

Brain imaging shows memory loss differs by age

Health
March 7 (UPI) -- High-resolution brain imaging can be used to show memory proficiency between older and younger adults, according to University of California researchers.Using magnetic resonance imaging, researchers at the University of California, Irvine, found patterns in memory loss during two tests of memory, an object memory task and a location one."This suggests that not all memory changes equally with aging," lead author Zachariah Reagh, who participated in the study as a graduate student at UCI and is now a postdoctoral fellow at UC Davis, said in a press release. "Object memory is far more vulnerable than spatial, or location, memory -- at least in the early stages."As people get older, they often wonder whether its part of the normal part of aging or signs of early stages of a se...