News That Matters

Tag: many

Many Americans flying for holiday despite CDC pleas

Health
Millions of Americans bought tickets to fly somewhere for Thanksgiving before the nation’s top public health agency pleaded with them not to travel for the holidayBy MATT O'BRIEN AP Business WriterNovember 22, 2020, 10:06 PM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articlePROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Millions of Americans bought tickets to fly somewhere for Thanksgiving before the nation's top public health agency pleaded with them not to travel for the holiday.So what are they doing now? In many cases, they're still crowding airports and boarding planes. That's despite relatively lenient cancellation policies that major airlines have implemented since the coronavirus pandemic emerged earlier this year.“Consumers should feel comfortable changing their plans and canceling their flights

Many Americans will eventually need long-term care. Here’s how to pay for it

Finance
Morsa Images | DigitalVision | Getty ImagesChances are, you aren't seriously thinking about how to pay for long-term care when you are older.Most people only think about it at two points in their lives: when their parents need it or when they start to get much older and realize they need to have a plan, said Carolyn McClanahan, a physician and certified financial planner at Life Planning Partners in Jacksonville, Florida.Yet someone turning 65 years old today has almost a 70% chance of needing some type of long-term care services in their remaining years, according to the U.S.Department of Health and Human Services. Women need 3.7 years of care, while men need 2.2 years. The average lifetime cost of formal long-term care is $ 172,000, according to PWC. "The big thing that you at least nee...
Covid: How many cases might contact tracers have missed?

Covid: How many cases might contact tracers have missed?

Health
An IT failure has caused almost 16,000 coronavirus cases to go missing from official data in England. The infected individuals themselves were notified, and would hopefully have isolated to prevent spreading the infection, but the glitch meant none of their contacts were notified at the time. A BBC analysis suggests this could mean at least 34,000 contacts were left in the dark about having been exposed to the virus. And those missed contacts, who tracers are now urgently trying to reach, may have been unknowingly spreading the virus on to others for days.Who is affected?Speed is of the essence when it comes to contact-tracing. Every missed day represents an opportunity for the infection to travel.At the moment, about 60% of people who are reached by a co...
Many in migrant caravan bused back to Honduran border

Many in migrant caravan bused back to Honduran border

World
POPTUN, Guatemala -- Hundreds of Honduran migrants who had entered Guatemala this week without registering were being bused back to their country's border Saturday by authorities who met them with a large roadblock.By 5 a.m. Saturday, none of 1,000 or so migrants who had been stalled by police and soldiers remained along a stretch of rural highway remained. Police said that hours earlier, migrants had boarded buses and army trucks to be taken back to the border.Small groups of fewer than 10 migrants each could still be found walking along the highway before the roadblock Saturday morning.Olvin Suazo, 21, was walking with three friends, all from Santa Barbara, Honduras.“We're going to continue,” he said. “We were resting and the bigger group continued. We didn't know what happened to them.”

With so many people living longer, advisors help to make sure the fear of outliving money doesn’t become a reality

Finance
sturti | E+ | Getty ImagesAlfred Abraham has had colon cancer, prostate cancer, open heart surgery and his left eye removed.Yet at 100, he's still alive and well. Every day, he and his partner Brian eat fruit and salad and go for walks. He and his family were planning a big party to celebrate his becoming a centenarian this past April, but the pandemic wouldn't allow for it. "At the present time, I'm doing very nicely despite what's going on," said Abraham, a former CPA and bank executive who lives in New York. One big part of why he's doing so well is his financial advisor, he says.More from Advisor Insight:Target-date funds are getting more personalEight costly retirement mistakes to avoidPreparing heirs for the $ 68 trillion 'great wealth transfer'"He's doing a very good job ...