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Tag: measure

Scientists use rover's navigational sensors to measure Mars' gravity

Scientists use rover's navigational sensors to measure Mars' gravity

Science
Feb. 1 (UPI) -- Scientists were able to map Mars' gravity by repurposing data collected by the Curiosity rover's navigational sensors. After realizing Curiosity's accelerometers can be used like gravimeters when the rover is at a standstill, scientists surveyed navigational data collected during the mission's first five years. Researchers were able to plot changes in the Red Planet's gravity along the path the rover took as it ascended Mount Sharp. The new gravity data allowed scientists to estimate the density of the underlying rock along the rover's route. Gravity is weaker on the slopes of Mount Sharp than scientists expected, suggesting the sedimentary rock that forms the mountain isn't all that dense. "The lower levels of Mount Sharp are surprisingly porous," Kevin Lewis of Johns Hop...
Scientists use satellite images to measure household poverty

Scientists use satellite images to measure household poverty

Science
Jan. 7 (UPI) -- To more strategically allocate resources, set agenda priorities and track the progress of economic initiatives in the developing world, the United Nations is turning to satellite imagery. Researchers at Aarhus University in Denmark have developed methods for quantifying economic living conditions at the household level using high resolution satellite images. "Based on high-resolution satellite images, we can very precisely assess the status of poverty at household level in rural areas in developing countries," Jens-Christian Svenning, a professor and researcher at Aarhus, said in a news release. Using satellite images of portions of rural Kenya as a proof-of-concept test, scientists used several factors to estimate economic living conditions on local farms. Researchers ide...
Astronomers measure fastest non-lethal stellar blast in history

Astronomers measure fastest non-lethal stellar blast in history

Science
Aug. 2 (UPI) -- New measurements of Eta Carinae suggest the star system produced the fastest non-lethal stellar blast in history. Though the famed binary star system Eta Carinae exploded 170 years ago, scientists are still able to study the blast by measuring its light echoes. Light echoes are produced by light energy produced by stellar events bounce off and become redirected by distant gas clouds. Light echoes produced by the massive Eta Carinae -- witnessed by astronomers and laypeople alike during the mid-1800s -- continue to redirect toward Earth, allowing scientists to peer back into the annals of cosmic history. "A light echo is the next best thing to time travel," Nathan Smith, an astronomer at the University of Arizona, said in a news release. "That's why light echoes are so beau...
Scientists try to measure impact of pollution on animal behavior

Scientists try to measure impact of pollution on animal behavior

Science
July 27 (UPI) -- Scientists at the University of Plymouth are developing experiments and standards for quantifying the effects of pollution exposure on animal behavior. Researchers know animals are regularly exposed to toxic chemicals. They also know pollution exposure can alter behaviors related to survivability -- feeding, finding mates and avoiding predators. But measuring changes in behavior isn't easy. In a series of new experiments, scientists at Plymouth revealed potential flaws in traditional ways of measuring animal behavior. In a previous experiment, researchers showed amphipods, small crustaceans, swim away from pulses of light. They also found the animals like to swim near the tank wall in the lab. But as part of their most recent study, scientists showed the shape and size o...
Hubble, Gaia produce most precise measure of universe's expansion rate

Hubble, Gaia produce most precise measure of universe's expansion rate

Science
July 12 (UPI) -- By combining the observations of the two most powerful space telescopes in orbit, scientists have achieved the most precise measurement of the Hubble constant, the universe's expansion rate. The new measurement confirms the tension between explosion rate in the early and late universe, researchers report. Astronomers can measure the expansion of the universe by measuring a galaxy's redshift, a change in the wavelength of the light due to a change in the velocity of the object. By measuring the redshift of galaxies using the Hubble Telescope, scientists have established the Hubble constant. But investigations of the cosmic microwave background, the oldest radiation in the universe, can also be used to predict the universe's expansion rate. Maps of the microwave signature ...