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Tag: medical

NHS pressures ‘put medical breakthroughs at risk’

NHS pressures ‘put medical breakthroughs at risk’

Health
Future medical advances are at risk because NHS pressures are hampering the ability of staff to take part in vital research, leading academics say.The Academy of Medical Sciences said the number of doctors involved in research had fallen, while budgets had been frozen.It said despite shortages of staff on the front line, more priority still needed to be given to research.The government said it was looking to invest more in research generally.During the election, the Tories said they wanted to see funding double over the next five years to £18bn a year.That is for the whole research sector - although the NHS is expected to be a major beneficiary of this.The Academy of Medical Sciences said this would help, but NHS staff would need protected time to ensure
Study: Roughly 10% of U.S. children receive unnecessary medical care

Study: Roughly 10% of U.S. children receive unnecessary medical care

Health
Jan. 7 (UPI) -- Roughly one in 10 American children receive unnecessary healthcare services, driving up costs and exposing them to potential side effects, a new analysis suggests. An analysis of medical data for 8.6 million publicly and privately insured children in 12 states, published Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics, suggests young people receive diagnostic tests, imaging tests and prescription drugs they ultimately don't need. Many were treated for conditions, like acute sinus infections, they didn't have and were given antibiotics for colds, which is considered inappropriate according to most care guidelines. Part of the issue may be a fear of missing something, on the part of both doctors and parents, researchers say. "There are steps that parents can take to minimize the possibi...
Medical examiner in Sandy Hook massacre, other crimes dies

Medical examiner in Sandy Hook massacre, other crimes dies

Technology
A former longtime Connecticut chief medical examiner who played a key investigative role in the state's most infamous murder cases has diedBy DAVE COLLINS Associated PressDecember 27, 2019, 7:54 PM2 min readHARTFORD, Conn. -- Dr. H. Wayne Carver II, the former Connecticut chief medical examiner whose office examined the bodies of victims of the state's most infamous homicides, including the children and educators killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School, has died. He was 67. Carver died Thursday night at Middlesex Hospital in Middletown, said Dr. James Gill, current chief medical examiner. Carver's death was natural, he said, but the exact cause was not immediately clear. Carver, a portly man known for his dark sense of humor, joined the medical examiner's office in 1983 and headed the offi...
Fake doctors, pilfered medical records drive Oxy China sales

Fake doctors, pilfered medical records drive Oxy China sales

Health
Thousands of lawsuits across the United States have accused a drug company owned by the billionaire Sackler family of using false claims to push highly addictive opioids on an unsuspecting nation, fueling the deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history. Yet, even as its U.S. drugmaker collapses under the charges, another company owned by the family has used the same tactics to peddle its signature painkiller, OxyContin, in China, according to interviews with current and former employees and documents obtained by the Associated Press. The documents and interviews indicate that representatives from the Sacklers’ Chinese affiliate, Mundipharma, tell doctors that time-release painkillers like OxyContin are less addictive than other opioids—the same pitch that Purdue Pharma, the U.S. company owned
Study: 40 percent of medical clinics refuse to treat regular opioid users

Study: 40 percent of medical clinics refuse to treat regular opioid users

Health
July 12 (UPI) -- People who take opioids for chronic pain have a harder time finding a doctor than non-opioid taking patients, a new study. About 40 percent of primary care clinics refuse to take patients who regularly use Percocet, regardless of what type of health insurance they have, according to research published Friday in JAMA Network Open. "Anecdotally, we were hearing about patients with chronic pain becoming 'pain refugees,' being abruptly tapered from their opioids or having their current physician stop refilling their prescription, leaving them to search for pain relief elsewhere," Pooja Lagisetty, a researcher at the University of Michigan and study lead researcher, said in a news release. "These findings are concerning because it demonstrates just how difficult it may be for...