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Tag: medical

Study: Half of adults with heart disease have trouble paying medical bills

Study: Half of adults with heart disease have trouble paying medical bills

Health
Feb. 11 (UPI) -- Adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, or ASCVD, are having a tough time paying to treat their condition, a study says. More than 45 percent of non-elderly adults with ASCVD have financial troubles brought on by medical bills, and one in five say they can't pay their medical bills at all, according to a study published this month in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. "It is remarkably disheartening to see how many people suffer severe financial adverse effects of having atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease," Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist and director of the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, said in a news release. "We have much work to do to ensure that people are spared the financial toxicity of disease that is imposed by ...
Chronic pain given as top reason for using medical marijuana

Chronic pain given as top reason for using medical marijuana

Health
Chronic pain is the most common reason people give when they enroll in state-approved medical marijuana programs. That's followed by stiffness from multiple sclerosis and chemotherapy-related nausea, according to an analysis of 15 states published Monday in the journal Health Affairs. The study didn't measure whether marijuana actually helped anyone with their problems, but the patients' reasons match up with what's known about the science of marijuana and its chemical components. "The majority of patients for whom we have data are using cannabis for reasons where the science is the strongest," said lead author Kevin Boehnke of University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. California became the first state to allow medical use of marijuana in 1996. More than 30 states now allow marijuana for doze...
Few medical facilities offer opioid treatment medication, study says

Few medical facilities offer opioid treatment medication, study says

Health
Jan. 15 (UPI) -- Few medical facilities around the U.S. offer proper medication to treat opioid use disorder, even as the country continues to grapple with a growing epidemic, a study says. Only 36 percent of medical facilities offered patients addicted to opioids buprenorphine, naltrexone or methadone, the three medications approved by the FDA for long-term opioid management, according to a study published Tuesday in Health Affairs. "These results highlight the importance of Medicaid expansion in increasing the availability of medication treatment for opioid use disorder, though gaps in access remain widespread," Ramin Mojtabai, a professor in the Department of Mental Health at the Bloomberg School, said in a press release. More than 70 percent of medical facilities in Rhode Island, New ...
5 jobs and health insurance: One couple's struggle to pay off $12K in medical bills

5 jobs and health insurance: One couple's struggle to pay off $12K in medical bills

Health
This is a Kaiser Health News story. Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody, who is delighted by his ability to blow raspberries. They also have a stack of medical bills that threatens to undermine it all. In the months since their sturdy, brown-eyed boy was born, the Canos have acquired more than $ 12,000 in medical debt — so much that they need a spreadsheet to track what they owe to hospitals and doctors. “I’m on these payment arrangements that are killing us,” said Tiffany Cano, 37, who has spent her lunch hours on the phone negotiating payoff plans that now total $ 700 a month. “My husband is working four jobs. I work full time. We’re a hardworking family doing our best and n...
Oklahoma quickly becoming medical marijuana hotbed

Oklahoma quickly becoming medical marijuana hotbed

Health
The rollout of statewide medical and recreational marijuana programs typically is a grindingly slow process that can take years. Not so in Oklahoma, which moved with lightning speed once voters approved medical cannabis in June. The ballot question received 57 percent support and established one of the nation's most liberal medical pot laws in one of the most conservative states. Six months later, the cannabis industry is booming. Farmers and entrepreneurs are racing to start commercial grow operations, and the state is issuing licenses to new patients, growers and dispensary operators at a frantic pace. Retail outlets opened just four months after legalization. By contrast, voters in North Dakota, Ohio and neighboring Arkansas approved medical pot in 2016 but have yet to see sales begin...