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Tag: medications

Medications may not heal long-term knee pain, study says

Medications may not heal long-term knee pain, study says

Health
Dec. 21 (UPI) -- Drugs long thought to soothe long-term knee pain may not actually work, a study says. The research, published Friday in JAMA, come from 47 trials over the course of a year. The work found that only two drugs had any level of significant effectiveness, even though those drugs were only mildly successful. "This is the first meta-analysis in osteoarthritis (OA) that takes into account only long-term (defined as at least 12-month duration) clinical trials," Lucio Rovati, a researcher at Department of Medicine and Surgery and study author, told UPI in an email interview. "Analysis of long-term data is particularly important because OA (knee OA in our case, i.e. the most common form and joint localization of OA) is a chronic and progressive disease, but most medications are stu...
2 high blood pressure medications added to recall of heart drug

2 high blood pressure medications added to recall of heart drug

Health
A Food and Drug Administration recall of a heart medication due to a cancer-causing chemical now includes two blood pressure medications. Teva Pharmaceuticals has issued a voluntary recall of its amlodipine/valsartan combination tablets and amlodipine/valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination tablets, both used to treat high blood pressure, according to the FDA. The FDA announced the recall on its website Tuesday. The move is due to the detection of a probable human carcinogen known as NDEA, which has been found in valsartan API, the FDA said. Valsartan API is an active pharmaceutical ingredient made by Mylan India, according to the FDA. “This chemical is typically found in very small amounts in certain foods, drinking water, air pollution, and certain industrial processes,...
Could your medications be making you depressed?

Could your medications be making you depressed?

Health
When you hear of a drug having side-effects you might think of a physical reaction like a rash or a headache.But according to a new US study, many commonly-prescribed drugs may increase the risk of depression.The list includes heart medications, birth control pills and some painkillers - things lots of people in the UK are also prescribed. More than a third of the drugs the 26,000 participants took had depression as a possible side-effect.What's going on?The study, in the Journal of the American Medical Association, looked only at people in the US who were 18 or older and taking at least one type of prescription medication between 2005 to 2014.It found that 37% of these prescription drugs, which also included some painkillers and antacids, had depression ...