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Tag: Memory

Parents’ ‘memory’ of environmental stress inherited across generations

Parents’ ‘memory’ of environmental stress inherited across generations

Science
July 9 (UPI) -- While actual memories aren't passed along to offspring, new research suggests the genetic effects of environmental stressors experienced by parents can be inherited across generations. The findings, published this week in the journal eLife, offer a new perspective on the nature-versus-nurture debate. "While neuronally encoded behavior isn't thought to be inherited across generations, we wanted to test the possibility that environmentally triggered modifications could allow 'memory' of parental experiences to be inherited," Julianna "Lita" Bozler, a doctoral candidate in the Bosco Lab at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, said in a news release. For their experiment, researchers exposed fruit flies, Drosophilia melanogaster, to parasitoid wasps, which deposit thei...
Compound from Rhodiola plant improved memory in mice in study

Compound from Rhodiola plant improved memory in mice in study

Health
Oct. 25 (UPI) -- An active ingredient from the medicinal plant Rhodiola rosea may improve memory, according to a study with flies and mice. The plant has been known to increase mental performance, but researchers wanted to find out which specific substances improved memory. Their findings were published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. Rhodiola rosea, which is also called golden root, rose root and roseroot, grows naturally in wild Arctic regions of Europe, Asia and North America. It has been long used to treat several disorders, notably including treatment of anxiety and depression. "In order to make this knowledge useful for medicine, we wanted to find out which specific substances from Rhodiola improve memory," first author Dr. Birgit Michels, from the Leibniz Institutes for ...
People with good spatial memory are better at smelling

People with good spatial memory are better at smelling

Science
Oct. 19 (UPI) -- People with good spatial memory are better at identifying smells than those with poor navigational skills. The link makes sense, researchers at McGill University argue, because animals evolved a keen sense of smell to aid navigation. Most animals rely on their olfactory system to track down food. Smells also help some animals find mates. However, for modern humans, the olfactory system is much less important that it was for human ancestors and distant relatives. Scientists were skeptical that they could confirm a correlation. Researchers designed a series of experiments to test participants' spatial memory and sense of smell. In one test, participants explored a virtual city, trekking down each street and passing by the city's 20 landmarks. Afterwards, participants were q...
'My memory is foggy': Selma Blair reveals MS diagnosis

'My memory is foggy': Selma Blair reveals MS diagnosis

Entertainment
Selma Blair has revealed she has been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The 46-year-old actress, who has starred in films such as Cruel Intentions and Legally Blonde, said she had suffered symptoms of the condition "for years" but was diagnosed two months ago.Sharing an emotional post on Instagram, Blair said she was "OK", but admitted it had been "overwhelming in the beginning".She said: "I am disabled. I fall sometimes. I drop things. My memory is foggy. And my left side is asking for directions from a broken GPS."She added, however, that thanks to the support of the cast and crew of the upcoming Netflix show Another Life, she has been able to continue filming."We are doing it. I laugh and I don't know exactly what I will do precisely but I will do my best," she said.She...
Brain imaging shows memory loss differs by age

Brain imaging shows memory loss differs by age

Health
March 7 (UPI) -- High-resolution brain imaging can be used to show memory proficiency between older and younger adults, according to University of California researchers.Using magnetic resonance imaging, researchers at the University of California, Irvine, found patterns in memory loss during two tests of memory, an object memory task and a location one."This suggests that not all memory changes equally with aging," lead author Zachariah Reagh, who participated in the study as a graduate student at UCI and is now a postdoctoral fellow at UC Davis, said in a press release. "Object memory is far more vulnerable than spatial, or location, memory -- at least in the early stages."As people get older, they often wonder whether its part of the normal part of aging or signs of early stages of a se...