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Tag: Mexico

Mexico faces infectious waste disposal problem amid pandemic

Mexico faces infectious waste disposal problem amid pandemic

World
Mountains of infectious waste are piling up and being illegally dumped in Mexico, creating yet another grisly problem amid the coronavirus pandemicByThe Associated PressMay 18, 2020, 10:08 PM3 min read3 min readMEXICO CITY -- Mountains of infectious waste, including huge piles of discarded coffins and tons of hospital garbage, are popping up across Mexico amid the coronavirus pandemic, a grisly problem authorities attribute to illegal dumping and unscrupulous operators. Authorities announced on Monday that they had found 3.5 tons of hospital waste dumped in the woods on the outskirts of Mexico City, and 6,000 cubic yards (meters) of medical waste piled ceiling-high at a clandestine warehouse in Puebla state, leaking out of over-crammed trailers and buildings. Teetering piles of coffins, ...
New Mexico extends lockdown for town that’s a US hot spot

New Mexico extends lockdown for town that’s a US hot spot

Health
A small New Mexico city where rural residents from the largest American Indian reservation come to stock up on supplies is one of the nation’s worst coronavirus hot spotsBy MORGAN LEE Associated PressMay 7, 2020, 10:06 PM4 min read4 min readGALLUP, N.M. -- Traffic was almost nonexistent in this small New Mexico city, and just a handful of people waited their turn to get into grocery stores and other essential businesses. This place where rural residents from the largest American Indian reservation come to stock up on supplies is one of the nation's worst coronavirus hot spots, and the governor extended a lockdown Thursday to try to stem the spread. The emergency declaration for Gallup, a gateway to the Navajo Nation, runs through noon Sunday. Patients have filled intensive care beds as CO
Feathery find: One of the last dino raptors lived in New Mexico

Feathery find: One of the last dino raptors lived in New Mexico

Science
March 26 (UPI) -- Paleontologists have identified a new feathered dinosaur species, one of the last raptors to emerge before the dinosaurs were snuffed out. Researchers recovered the 67-million-year-old remains from a cretaceous rock deposit in New Mexico's San Juan Basin. Though the fossil was originally discovered in 2008, the excavation and examination process took more than decade. Scientists described the new species, Dineobellator notohesperus, in a paper published this week in the journal Scientific Reports. The species name translates as "Navajo warrior from the Southwest," a salute to the indigenous tribes that occupied the land where one of the world's last raptors once lived. Like it's infamous Asian relatives, members of the genus Velociraptor, Dineobellator notohesperus is ...

Nature reserve activist shot to death in central Mexico

World
Unidentified gunmen have shot to death a lawyer and activist who defended a rural tract against development near the Mexican city of CuernavacaByThe Associated PressMarch 24, 2020, 9:48 PM2 min readMEXICO CITY -- Unidentified gunmen shot to death a lawyer and activist who defended a rural tract against development near the Mexican city of Cuernavaca, Mexico's National Human Rights Commission said Tuesday. The governmental commission issued a statement condemning the killing of Isaac Medardo Herrera on Monday night. His neighborhood activist group in Jiutepec, Morelos posted a statement saying the killers knocked on the door of Herrera's home and shot him, before fleeing. Herrera had led a fight over at least four years to stop plans to build a housing development on the Los Venados tract...
Mexico: Monarch butterflies drop 53% in wintering area

Mexico: Monarch butterflies drop 53% in wintering area

Technology
Mexican officials say the number of monarch butterflies at their winter resting grounds decreased about 53% this yearByThe Associated PressMarch 13, 2020, 11:40 PM3 min readMEXICO CITY -- The number of monarch butterflies that showed up at their winter resting grounds decreased about 53% this year, Mexican officials said Friday. Some activists called the decline “heartbreaking," but the Mexico head of the World Wildlife Fund said the reduction “is not alarming.” WWF Mexico director Jorge Rickards said the previous year's large numbers were "atypical" and the monarchs had returned to their average population levels of recent years. The government commission for natural protected areas said the butterflies' population was “stable,” even though they covered only 2.8 hectares (6.9 acres) t