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Tag: mice

Drugs carried in cellular 'backpacks' help destroy solid tumors in mice

Drugs carried in cellular 'backpacks' help destroy solid tumors in mice

Health
July 10 (UPI) -- Nanoparticle "backpacks" with immune-stimulating drugs successfully helped T cells destroy solid tumors in mice, researchers report. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who developed the method found it could enhance the T cells' activity without harmful side effects. In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the researchers report that 60 percent of treated animals' tumors disappeared completely in an early test of the method. The drugs are made of a gel from molecules of cytokine IL-15 held together by a cross-linker that degrades when the T cell reaches a tumor and is activated. Nanoparticles are between 1 and 100 nanometers in size -- comparatively, a human hair is 75,000 nanometers thick. "We found you could greatly improve ...
Antifungal drug eliminates dormant bowel cancer cells in mice

Antifungal drug eliminates dormant bowel cancer cells in mice

Health
June 1 (UPI) -- An antifungal medication commonly prescribed to treat toenail infections helped eliminate dormant cells within bowel tumors in mice. Researchers at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute found that itraconazole effectively halts the growth and progression of certain types of colorectal cancer. Their findings were published Thursday in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. "This innovative study has taken a step toward addressing one of the biggest challenges in cancer research," Dr. Greg Hannon, director of the institute, said in a press release. "Tumors are made up of many different types of cancer cells, which can evolve separately and respond to treatments differently." Colorectal cancer of the colon and rectum is the second leading cancer killer in the United Stat...
Exercise leads to generation of new heart cells in study with mice

Exercise leads to generation of new heart cells in study with mice

Health
April 25 (UPI) -- Researchers have figured out why exercise is good for the heart, at least in mice: It helps the organ generate more new heart muscle cells.Exercise can even deliver the benefit after a heart attack, according to researchers from the Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. The researchers, who published their findings Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications, noted that public health, physical education and the rehabilitation of cardiac patients can help prevent heart failure."We wanted to know whether there is a natural way to enhance the regenerative capacity of heart muscle cells," Dr. Ana Vujic, a researcher at Harvard, said in a press release. "So we dec...
Miniature human brain implants survive, grow inside mice for months

Miniature human brain implants survive, grow inside mice for months

Science
April 16 (UPI) -- Miniature human brains, or human brain organoids, can survive and grow after being implanted in the skulls of mice. It's the first time human cerebral organoids have been installed inside another species.Researchers describe the breakthrough in a new paper published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology.Scientists grew the pea-sized brains from stem cells and then placed them inside the skulls of mice. Researchers removed a small amount of tissue to make room for the miniature brains. Tiny, transparent windows in the skulls of the test mice allowed scientists to keep tabs on the brain implants -- the organoids were also designed to express a green fluorescent protein, causing them to glow inside the mice skulls.Roughly 80 percent of the implants were successfully rec...
Alzheimer's disease reversed in mice, offering hope for humans, new research shows

Alzheimer's disease reversed in mice, offering hope for humans, new research shows

Health
"Remarkable" -- that’s how researchers are describing the results of a new study done on mice displaying traits associated with Alzheimer's disease. The deletion of just a single enzyme saw the near total reversal of the deposition of amyloid plaques found in brains of those with Alzheimer's, improving cognitive functions in the mouse subjects, according to the study from researchers at the Cleveland Clinic, published Feb. 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. These promising research findings center around deleting a gene that produces an enzyme called BACE1, which helps make the beta-amyloid peptides that accumulate abnormally in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Studies have shown that stopping or reducing that enzyme’s activity dramatically reduces production of b