News That Matters

Tag: mice

Sound influences the way mice and rats sense touch

Sound influences the way mice and rats sense touch

Science
Dec. 28 (UPI) -- New research suggests the brain's main sensory centers -- the visual cortex, auditory cortex and somatosensory cortex -- are influenced by one another. Through a series of tests, researchers in Japan showed auditory inputs to the barrel cortex in mice and rats influences the rodents' responses to tactile stimulation. The barrel cortex is a type of somatosensory cortex found in rodents. The region oversees the brain's perception of and response to touch, pain and temperature. Scientists think the link between the barrel cortex and rodent whiskers is similar to the link between the human brain's somatosensory cortex and human fingertips. Researchers used patch clamps, an electric brain recording technology, to measure the influence of different sensory inputs on individual ...
Mice raised communally fare better as adults

Mice raised communally fare better as adults

Science
Nov. 16 (UPI) -- It takes a village to raise a child -- and to raise a mouse. According to a new study, mice raised communally benefit from a competitive advantage as adults. The new research was published this week in the journal Scientific Reports. "Female house mice pursue two flexible social strategies, either raising their offspring in communal or single nests," Stefan Fischer, researcher at the University of Liverpool, said in a news release. "This makes them an ideal model species to study how these different approaches shape future development." The decision to raise mice communally or in a single nest is influenced by a variety of local conditions, including the levels of social competition, but until now, scientists hadn't measured the effects of rearing decisions on adult behav...
Compound from Rhodiola plant improved memory in mice in study

Compound from Rhodiola plant improved memory in mice in study

Health
Oct. 25 (UPI) -- An active ingredient from the medicinal plant Rhodiola rosea may improve memory, according to a study with flies and mice. The plant has been known to increase mental performance, but researchers wanted to find out which specific substances improved memory. Their findings were published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. Rhodiola rosea, which is also called golden root, rose root and roseroot, grows naturally in wild Arctic regions of Europe, Asia and North America. It has been long used to treat several disorders, notably including treatment of anxiety and depression. "In order to make this knowledge useful for medicine, we wanted to find out which specific substances from Rhodiola improve memory," first author Dr. Birgit Michels, from the Leibniz Institutes for ...
'Super-sized' mice threaten seabird colonies with extinction

'Super-sized' mice threaten seabird colonies with extinction

Science
Super-sized mice are killing millions of seabird chicks on a remote island in the South Atlantic, threatening some rare species with extinction. According to a study from the RSPB, the mice have learned to eat the eggs and chicks of the many millions of birds that make Gough Island their home.The group says that without action, the endangered Tristan albatross is likely to go extinct.A campaign is planned to eradicate the mice entirely in 2020. Restoring South Georgia's wildlife paradise Same-sex mice have babies Gough Island is a remote UK Overseas Territory, considered to be one of the world's most important seabird colonies, hosting more than 10 million birds. Mice...
First esophagus grown from stem cells transplanted into mice

First esophagus grown from stem cells transplanted into mice

Health
Oct. 18 (UPI) -- Researchers for the first time have grown a functional esophagus from stem cells and transplanted the food pipe successfully in mice. This engineering process could pave the way to the creation of lab-grown food pipes for children with congenital and acquired gut conditions, according to researchers at the University of College London's Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health. The development could help reduce the need for donated organs, which are often in short supply -- especially for pediatric patients -- and significantly lowers the risk of a donor organ being rejected by the patient's body. A paper on the work, conducted by researchers at UCL, as well as the Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Francis Crick Institute, was published this week in the journal Na...