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Compound from Rhodiola plant improved memory in mice in study

Compound from Rhodiola plant improved memory in mice in study

Health
Oct. 25 (UPI) -- An active ingredient from the medicinal plant Rhodiola rosea may improve memory, according to a study with flies and mice. The plant has been known to increase mental performance, but researchers wanted to find out which specific substances improved memory. Their findings were published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. Rhodiola rosea, which is also called golden root, rose root and roseroot, grows naturally in wild Arctic regions of Europe, Asia and North America. It has been long used to treat several disorders, notably including treatment of anxiety and depression. "In order to make this knowledge useful for medicine, we wanted to find out which specific substances from Rhodiola improve memory," first author Dr. Birgit Michels, from the Leibniz Institutes for ...
'Super-sized' mice threaten seabird colonies with extinction

'Super-sized' mice threaten seabird colonies with extinction

Science
Super-sized mice are killing millions of seabird chicks on a remote island in the South Atlantic, threatening some rare species with extinction. According to a study from the RSPB, the mice have learned to eat the eggs and chicks of the many millions of birds that make Gough Island their home.The group says that without action, the endangered Tristan albatross is likely to go extinct.A campaign is planned to eradicate the mice entirely in 2020. Restoring South Georgia's wildlife paradise Same-sex mice have babies Gough Island is a remote UK Overseas Territory, considered to be one of the world's most important seabird colonies, hosting more than 10 million birds. Mice...
First esophagus grown from stem cells transplanted into mice

First esophagus grown from stem cells transplanted into mice

Health
Oct. 18 (UPI) -- Researchers for the first time have grown a functional esophagus from stem cells and transplanted the food pipe successfully in mice. This engineering process could pave the way to the creation of lab-grown food pipes for children with congenital and acquired gut conditions, according to researchers at the University of College London's Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health. The development could help reduce the need for donated organs, which are often in short supply -- especially for pediatric patients -- and significantly lowers the risk of a donor organ being rejected by the patient's body. A paper on the work, conducted by researchers at UCL, as well as the Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Francis Crick Institute, was published this week in the journal Na...
Drugs carried in cellular 'backpacks' help destroy solid tumors in mice

Drugs carried in cellular 'backpacks' help destroy solid tumors in mice

Health
July 10 (UPI) -- Nanoparticle "backpacks" with immune-stimulating drugs successfully helped T cells destroy solid tumors in mice, researchers report. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who developed the method found it could enhance the T cells' activity without harmful side effects. In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the researchers report that 60 percent of treated animals' tumors disappeared completely in an early test of the method. The drugs are made of a gel from molecules of cytokine IL-15 held together by a cross-linker that degrades when the T cell reaches a tumor and is activated. Nanoparticles are between 1 and 100 nanometers in size -- comparatively, a human hair is 75,000 nanometers thick. "We found you could greatly improve ...
Antifungal drug eliminates dormant bowel cancer cells in mice

Antifungal drug eliminates dormant bowel cancer cells in mice

Health
June 1 (UPI) -- An antifungal medication commonly prescribed to treat toenail infections helped eliminate dormant cells within bowel tumors in mice. Researchers at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute found that itraconazole effectively halts the growth and progression of certain types of colorectal cancer. Their findings were published Thursday in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. "This innovative study has taken a step toward addressing one of the biggest challenges in cancer research," Dr. Greg Hannon, director of the institute, said in a press release. "Tumors are made up of many different types of cancer cells, which can evolve separately and respond to treatments differently." Colorectal cancer of the colon and rectum is the second leading cancer killer in the United Stat...