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Tag: Microsoft

Microsoft, Twitter and Walmart want to help you get a job in tech — without racking up student loans

Microsoft, Twitter and Walmart want to help you get a job in tech — without racking up student loans

Finance
Ryan Reed became a technical support specialist at IBM after graduating last year from the tech firm's apprenticeship program. Photo credit: IBM.Ryan Reed was having a tough time.The 38-year-old, a resident of Raleigh, North Carolina, had been trying for months to land a job in technology, a passion dating to his days as a second-grader disassembling flashlights for fun.But the former firefighter, who'd suffered a career-ending back injury, didn't have a college degree — a formidable roadblock in the industry. With five kids to support, he couldn't afford to go back to school.Luck was on Reed's side, though. In 2018, he found — and landed — a paid apprenticeship as part of a new program at IBM, and was recently hired full-time.A growing push among tech firms to hire, pay and train apprenti
Microsoft: ‘carbon-negative’ by 2030 even for supply chain

Microsoft: ‘carbon-negative’ by 2030 even for supply chain

Technology
Microsoft says it will be 100% “carbon-negative” by 2030 by removing more carbon from the environment than it emitsBy MATT O'BRIEN AP Technology WriterJanuary 16, 2020, 7:52 PM3 min read Microsoft is pledging to become 100% “carbon-negative” by 2030 by removing more carbon from the environment than it emits. CEO Satya Nadella said Thursday that the commitment will happen "not just across our direct emissions, but across our supply chain, too.” It's a major step up from Microsoft's previous green pledges. The tech company had previously said its data centers would be 60% powered by renewable electricity by the end of last year, but environmental groups have said it has fallen short of such rivals as Google and Apple by relying too much on purchasing renewable energy credits to make up for i
Microsoft ends Windows 7 support: What should you do?

Microsoft ends Windows 7 support: What should you do?

Technology
Cyber-security experts are urging Windows 7 users to upgrade their operating system. Microsoft is going to stop supporting Windows 7 from Tuesday so that it can focus on "newer technologies". As a result, Windows 7 users will no longer receive the all-important security updates and patches that keep their machines safe. One in four Windows users is running Windows 7, according to statistics website StatCounter.What does this all mean?It means that Microsoft is ending the cat-and-mouse game with hackers seeking to exploit software bugs in the Windows 7 operating system. If perpetrators find a flaw in Windows 7, Microsoft will not fix it. Without continued software and security updates, Windows 7 machines are more likely to be infected with viruses and malw...
Microsoft arm backs ‘kidtech’ start-up SuperAwesome

Microsoft arm backs ‘kidtech’ start-up SuperAwesome

Business
The venture capital arm of Microsoft, the American technology behemoth, is to buy a stake in a six-year-old British company which produces software to protect children online.Sky News has learnt that M12 - which was previously called Microsoft Ventures - is close to striking a deal to become a shareholder in SuperAwesome. The transaction, which is expected to be confirmed next month, will represent a big milestone for SuperAwesome.Set up in 2013 by Dylan Collins, the company has attracted business from some of the world's biggest advertisers to children amid increasingly strict regulation.Multinationals including Kellogg's, Mattel, Nintendo and Unilever are among the brands listed on SuperAwesome's website as clients of the British start-up. ...

Amazon sues Pentagon over $10B contract awarded to Microsoft

Technology
Amazon is suing the Pentagon over a $ 10 billion cloud-computing contract awarded to MicrosoftByThe Associated PressNovember 23, 2019, 2:25 AM1 min read Amazon is suing the Pentagon over a $ 10 billion cloud-computing contract awarded to Microsoft. Amazon said it filed a legal complaint Friday with the U.S. Court of Federal Claims seeking to challenge the decision. The complaint is sealed, but the company said earlier this month there was “unmistakable bias” on the government’s part. Amazon’s competitive bid for the “war cloud” project drew criticism from President Donald Trump, who said over the summer that he wanted the Pentagon to take a closer look. The Pentagon awarded the contract to Microsoft in late October. U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper has said the procurement was done fair