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China slowdown might shed light on COVID-19’s path through U.S.

China slowdown might shed light on COVID-19’s path through U.S.

Health
March 20 (UPI) -- Assuming people comply with public health guidance on the new coronavirus, such as social distancing and hand hygiene, researchers say the trajectory of the disease in the United States could mimic what has happened in China and South Korea. According to an analysis by Our World in Data, China -- where the COVID-19 outbreak began -- saw a rapid rise in new cases after the 100th person was diagnosed with the disease in mid-January. That spike lasted until roughly 30 days later, when new case numbers were still high, but stable. Now, some 60 days later, officials in China have reported no new "localized" cases for two consecutive days. South Korea, due in large part to an aggressive testing campaign, saw numbers of new cases stabilize, albeit at elevated levels, roughly 3...
An adaptive gut microbiome might have shaped human evolution

An adaptive gut microbiome might have shaped human evolution

Science
Feb. 19 (UPI) -- How did human beings end up as one of the most successful species on Earth? New research suggests the unique nature of the human microbiome may have shaped human evolution and the dispersal of humans across the globe. For the study, published Wednesday in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, an interdisciplinary team of scientists compiled a range of previously published research in order to compare the microbiota among humans, apes and other non-human primates. Their findings showed the microbes found on and inside humans are especially unique. "Humans have strange skin microbes, strange stomachs (with consequences for gut microbes), unusual vaginal microbiomes and more," lead study author Rob Dunn, ecologist at North Carolina State University, told UPI in a...
These people might face a surprise health insurance tax this year

These people might face a surprise health insurance tax this year

Finance
John FedeleThis year, the IRS will let you slide on a penalty if you didn't have health insurance in 2019.Your home state, on the other hand, may not be so forgiving.The 2019 tax year marks the first time that filers won't be required to carry qualifying health-care coverage under the Affordable Care Act.As recently as the 2018 tax year, people who went without coverage were assessed a fee when they filed their federal tax returns. Either they paid $ 695 per uninsured adult or $ 347.50 for each child or they were assessed 2.5% of their yearly household income.More from Personal Finance:Seniors can't pay for basics, and Social Security's not enoughLaw took a retirement strategy out of play. How to get around itWhat to do about Medicare if you're almost 65 and workingThe Tax Cuts and Jobs Ac...
Why now might be a good time to save in a Roth 401(k) or Roth IRA

Why now might be a good time to save in a Roth 401(k) or Roth IRA

Finance
Jason York | Getty ImagesIt may be a better time than ever to save in a Roth retirement account.A Roth 401(k) plan or Roth individual retirement account allows savers to stash away money after it's been taxed, meaning Uncle Sam won't take a bite when retirees withdraw their funds later. Contributions to a "traditional" or pre-tax account — the other choice for retirement savings — are taxed upon withdrawal, instead of upfront.Roth funds, therefore, may make more financial sense for savers who expect to pay a higher income tax rate in retirement relative to what it is now. Given current economic and political dynamics, a Roth account may make sense for more Americans than in past years."The only way to go is up," Steve Rosenthal, a senior fellow at the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, sai
Why tomato puree might improve male fertility

Why tomato puree might improve male fertility

Health
Lycopene - a nutrient found in tomatoes - may boost sperm quality, a study has suggested.Healthy men who took the equivalent of two tablespoons of (concentrated) tomato puree a day as a supplement were found to have better quality sperm.Male infertility affects up to half of couples who cannot conceive.Fertility experts said more studies were needed involving men known to have fertility problems.NHS advice for men experiencing fertility problems currently suggests they adopt a healthy lifestyle and wear loose-fitting underwear.It also suggests reducing stress as much as possible and ensuring they have regular sex around the time their partner ovulates to maximise the chances of conception.But the idea that certain nutrients could boost male fertility has ...