News That Matters

Tag: mighty

Jakobshavn Isbrae: Mighty Greenland glacier slams on brakes

Jakobshavn Isbrae: Mighty Greenland glacier slams on brakes

Science
European satellites have detailed the abrupt change in behaviour of one of Greenland's most important glaciers.In the 2000s, Jakobshavn Isbrae was the fastest flowing ice stream on the island, travelling at 17km a year.As it sped to the ocean, its front end also retreated and thinned, dropping in height by as much as 20m year.But now it's all change. Jakobshavn is travelling much more slowly, and its trunk has even begun to thicken and lengthen."It's a complete reversal in behaviour and it wasn't predicted," said Dr Anna Hogg from Leeds University and the UK Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM)."The question now is: what's next for Jakobshavn? Is this just a pause, or is it a switch-off of the dynamic thinning we've ...
Zara McDermott, Ellie Brown and Samira Mighty thrill fans with joint sexiest snap

Zara McDermott, Ellie Brown and Samira Mighty thrill fans with joint sexiest snap

Entertainment
The trio have been busy updating their Instagram accounts while sunning it up in Bali.Helping one another take sexy shots, Zara McDermott, Ellie Brown and Samira Mighty have been flooding their fans with tantalising pics.But the Love Island threesome left the best to last as Samira shared a seriously seductive shot of them all lying on floats in the pool.Taking from afar, the group all stare into the lens while posing in bikinis.Samira twisted her body to showcase her peachy rear, while Ellie and Zara both posed on their backs.Meanwhile Zara posed up a storm in a bright Barbie pink bikini, held up by her assets alone.While Ellie appeared to be asleep, fans couldn’t help but focus on Samira who looked sensational as she strutted her stuff. “Ok but Samira slays this whole picture... like daa
UK-US initiative to study mighty Thwaites Glacier

UK-US initiative to study mighty Thwaites Glacier

Science
It is going to be one of the biggest projects ever undertaken in Antarctica. UK and US scientists will lead a five-year effort to examine the stability of the mighty Thwaites Glacier. This ice stream in the west of the continent is comparable in size to Britain. It is melting and is currently in rapid retreat, accounting for around 4% of global sea-level rise - an amount that has doubled since the mid-1990s. Researchers want to know if Thwaites could collapse. Were it to do so, its lost ice would push up the oceans by 80cm or more. Some computer models have suggested such an outcome is inevitable if conditions continue as they are - albeit on a timescale of centuries. But these simulations need to be anchored in many more real-world observations, which will now be acquired thanks to the jo...