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Tag: missions

Last man on moon warns new lunar missions of ‘deep space risks’

Last man on moon warns new lunar missions of ‘deep space risks’

Technology
By Greg Milam, US correspondent Harrison Schmitt says he doesn't much enjoy travelling by air these days.Having just celebrated his 84th birthday, he sighs at the prospect of a cross-country journey by passenger jet. When you've done a half-a-million-mile round trip to the moon in your lifetime, perhaps you come to perceive travel somewhat differently to the rest of us. Schmitt has travelled a lot this week, to honour and be honoured as part of the 50th anniversary celebrations for the pinnacle of NASA's Apollo mission.He was one of the hundreds of thousands in the US space programme, the men and women who answered the call of President John F Kennedy and landed Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon in July 1969. ...
Mars missions and rockets: Cornwall in deep-space revolution

Mars missions and rockets: Cornwall in deep-space revolution

Technology
By Dan Whitehead, home news correspondent Scientists at a satellite earth station in Cornwall say they will be able to provide deep-space communication facilities for missions to Mars within the next five years. Goonhilly Earth Station - once the largest satellite station in the world - is investing nearly £10m in upgrading some of its biggest antenna to be able to communicate with deep-space missions. Ian Jones, chief executive of Goonhilly Earth Station, said: "There's a lot of changes in the space industry at the moment - a lot of excitement - a lot of exploration - and new missions to the moon and Mars and we're going to be the first private company to be providing the communications services for those missions."
Apollo 11 at 50: Mission’s scientific legacy was just getting to the moon

Apollo 11 at 50: Mission’s scientific legacy was just getting to the moon

Science
June 17 (UPI) -- In 1961, when President John F. Kennedy called on the United States to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade, he wasn't inspired by a curiosity about the moon's formation. Kennedy felt the intense pressure of the Cold War, and in the wake of Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin becoming the first human in space, Kennedy called on the United States to "catch up to and overtake" the Soviet Union in the so-called space race. "This was war by another means," Roger Launius, former chief historian of NASA, told UPI. Today, dozens of scientific experiments regularly travel to and from the International Space Station, and each new NASA mission features an array of scientific instruments and objectives. But during the early 1960s, NASA wasn't sure if space exploration beyond n...
Company faked NASA tests and ruined missions worth $700m

Company faked NASA tests and ruined missions worth $700m

Technology
A company which manufactured aluminium components for NASA faked test results over 19 years, leading to the destruction of two space missions worth $ 700m (£536m).A NASA investigation into the root cause for two failed launches in 2009 and 2011 discovered that materials produced by Sapa Profiles Inc (SPI) were faulty. SPI was found to have falsified thousands of certifications for aluminium extrusions for hundreds of customers in a 19-year scheme.The company is a unit of Norsk Hydro, one of the world's largest suppliers of aluminium. Norsk agreed to pay $ 46m back to NASA for the failures, less than 7% of the damage it caused.The two launches, one of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and another for a satellite called Glory which would have observed aerosol pollution, failed within
Unique microbe could thrive on Mars, help future manned missions

Unique microbe could thrive on Mars, help future manned missions

Science
June 18 (UPI) -- New research suggests certain cyanobacteria could thrive on Mars. The microbes could even be used to provide future space colonies with oxygen. "This might sound like science fiction, but space agencies and private companies around the world are actively trying to turn this aspiration into reality in the not-too-distant future," Elmars Krausz, chemistry professor at Australian National University, said in a news release. "Photosynthesis could theoretically be harnessed with these types of organisms to create air for humans to breathe on Mars." Cyanobacteria are the only photosynthetic prokaryotes capable of producing oxygen. They're the most abundant ground of bacteria on the planet and have colonized Earth since as early as 2.5 billion years ago. Several cyanobacteria h...