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Tag: money

Investors are pouring money into cyber-security sector

Investors are pouring money into cyber-security sector

Finance
Data breaches such as Equifax's recent hacking scandal are a nightmare for hundreds of millions of consumers. They do, however, offer lucrative opportunities for niche investors and venture capitalists who are banking on the ability of new cybersecurity, artificial intelligence and data protection technologies to solve one of the world's largest evolving problems."Security is one of the best near- to mid-term market segments to be in," said venture capitalist Rick Grinnell, who began investing in early stage cybersecurity and artificial intelligence firms more than 15 years ago and now operates his own venture capital firm, Glasswing Ventures.Venture capital firms invested $ 3.1 billion in nearly 300 cybersecurity startups in 2016, according to research firm CB Insights. Top-funded, privat...
How should I invest my inheritance money?

How should I invest my inheritance money?

Finance
Sallie Krawcheck wants to close the 'gender investing gap'What are the best ways for 20-somethings to invest inheritance money? -- Jason Staring at a new big balance in your bank account can be exciting. It can also freak you out. On one hand, an inheritance could open up new financial opportunities: paying off your student debt once and for all, buying a home, going on a big vacation, starting a business. You're not alone if your first inclination is to buy a boat, throw a lavish party, or put it all into the stock market. People often don't treat the money received through some kind of windfall the same way they do their regular income. There's even science behind it. A concept called "mental accounting" explains why we value some money differently than other money, according to the w...
Why you're hardwired to be bad at money

Why you're hardwired to be bad at money

Finance
How to save $ 1,000 this yearWhy are money decisions so stressful? No, it's not because you're broke. It's because your brain is fundamentally challenged when it comes to financial choices, according to neuroscience. And going it alone only makes it worse. "Our brains are really good at avoiding major risks and keeping ourselves alive," says Dr. Sam Barnett, a neuroscientist at Think Alike Labs and chief executive of SBB Research, a quantitative investment firm, who was the lead researcher. "Our brains were not designed to make the kind of complex decisions our financial realities demand, the kind that have many correct answers." There isn't just one right way to save money, for example. You could put your money in a shoe box, a high-yield savings account or a money market fund and each...
Trump declares US opioid emergency but pledges no new money

Trump declares US opioid emergency but pledges no new money

Health
In ringing and personal terms, President Donald Trump on Thursday pledged that "we will overcome addiction in America," declaring opioid abuse a national public health emergency and announcing new steps to combat what he described as the worst drug crisis in U.S. history. Trump's declaration, which will be effective for 90 days and can be renewed, will allow the government to redirect resources in various ways and to expand access to medical services in rural areas. But it won't bring new dollars to fight a scourge that kills nearly 100 people a day. "As Americans we cannot allow this to continue," Trump said in a speech at the White House, where he bemoaned an epidemic he said had spared no segment of society, affecting rural areas and cities, rich and poor and both the elderly and newbo...
How to invest without losing money

How to invest without losing money

Finance
Money guide for MillennialsWhen it comes to investing, realize that risk and reward tend to move in opposite directions. If you take more risks, you run a larger chance of losing your money, but you often have a higher upside. It's possible to invest without losing money. In the current market, where interest rates are very low, any investment guaranteed to not lose money will have a very small return. For most people thinking about investing, the goal is to minimize the potential for losses while maximizing how much you might make. Exactly how you do that -- and where you put your money -- depends a lot on what type of investor you are, and what your goals are. There is no one answer A 67-year-old looking to live off his or her investments has different needs from a 22-year-old planning ...