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Stocks are set to jump at Monday’s open, Dow futures rise more than 200 points

Stocks are set to jump at Monday’s open, Dow futures rise more than 200 points

Finance
A man walks by the Wall Street subway sign on March 23, 2020 in New York City.Angela Weiss | AFP | Getty ImagesU.S. stock futures rose on Sunday night as Wall Street tried to recover from another decline last week while investors shook off rising tensions between Saudi Arabia and Russia.Dow Jones Industrial Average futures traded more than 200 points higher, or 1.2%. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures also climbed more than 1%.Last week, the major averages posted their third weekly decline in four. The Dow slid 2.7% while the S&P 500 lost 2.1%. The Nasdaq Composite closed last week down 1.7%. Stocks are also deep in bear-market territory as concerns over the coronavirus outbreak have virtually shut down the global economy and have dampened sentiment around corporate profits. ...
Drylands to become more abundant, less productive due to climate change

Drylands to become more abundant, less productive due to climate change

Science
April 3 (UPI) -- Today, drylands cover more than 40 percent of Earth's land surface. But according to a new study, that number is likely to increase in the coming decades as large swaths of the planet get hotter and drier. Modeling efforts led by researchers from Washington State University suggest drylands are likely to become more abundant but less productive. Some 38 percent of Earth's population lives on drylands, which consist mainly of savannas, grasslands and shrub lands. Drylands host important carbon sequestration processes, and provide acreage for grazing and non-irrigated croplands. But according to the latest research, published this week in the journal Nature Communications, drylands are likely to support less and less vegetation as a result of climate change. "Our results ...
More evidence indicates healthy people can spread virus

More evidence indicates healthy people can spread virus

Technology
More evidence is emerging that coronavirus infections are being spread by people who have no clear symptoms. The findings complicate efforts to gain control of the pandemicBy MIKE STOBBE AP Medical WriterApril 1, 2020, 9:55 PM5 min read5 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleNEW YORK -- Scientists offered more evidence Wednesday that the coronavirus is spread by seemingly healthy people who show no clear symptoms, and the federal government issued new guidance warning that anyone exposed to the disease can be considered a carrier. A study by researchers in Singapore became the latest to estimate that somewhere around 10% of new infections may be sparked by people who carry the virus but have not yet suffered its flu-like symptoms. In response to that study and others,...
Peacock spiders show more of their colours

Peacock spiders show more of their colours

Science
OK, a lot of people don't like arachnids. But c'mon, these little guys are simply stunning.Seven new peacock spiders have been described in the journal Zootaxa.And just like their cousins in the Maratus genus, they all live in Australia and they all feature those amazing iridescent colours that the males will flaunt during courtship.The man behind the descriptions is Museums Victoria's Joseph Schubert, a 22-year-old peacock spider specialist.He's now written up 12 of the 85 known species in this group. He often gets sent specimens to identify, but also conducts fieldwork. The names of the new species a...
Whales face more fatal ship collisions as waters warm

Whales face more fatal ship collisions as waters warm

Technology
PORTLAND, Maine -- Climate change is imperiling the world's largest animals by increasing the likelihood of fatal collisions between whales and big ships that ply the same waters. Warming ocean temperatures are causing some species of whales in pursuit of food to stray more frequently into shipping lanes, scientists say. The phenomenon already has increased ship strikes involving rare North Atlantic right whales on the East Coast and giant blue whales on the West Coast, researchers say. The number of strikes off California increased threefold in 2018 — to at least 10 — compared to previous years. When whales are killed in a ship collision, they often sink and don't always wash ashore. So scientists and conservationists say fatal ship strikes are dramatically under-reported. Vessels strik