Friday, June 24News That Matters
Shadow

Tag: ‘Mummified’

Mummified parrots suggest ancient trade routes crossed South American desert

Mummified parrots suggest ancient trade routes crossed South American desert

Science
March 29 (UPI) -- The recovery of ancient mummified parrots in South America, dating to between 1100 and 1450 AD, suggest trade routes crossed the Atacama Desert, according to a study published Monday in PNAS. "Feathers are valued across the Americas and we see them in high-status burials," José M. Capriles , said in a press release. Advertisement "We don't know how the feathers got there, the routes they took or the network," Capriles, an assistant professor of anthropology at Pennsylvania State University. Northern Chile's Atacama Desert is the driest desert in the world, and parrots and macaws are not normally found in the region. However, archaeologists have unearthed the feathers of the exotic birds at human burial sites, as well as the mummified remains of parrots and macaws. Scien...
Ancient Egypt: Mummified animals ‘digitally unwrapped’ in 3D scans

Ancient Egypt: Mummified animals ‘digitally unwrapped’ in 3D scans

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device Three mummified animals from ancient Egypt have been digitally unwrapped and dissected by researchers using high-resolution 3D scans. The snake, bird and cat, from the Egypt Centre's collection at Swansea University, are at least 2,000 years old. Ancient texts suggest they were offerings to the souls of the departed, but little was known of their fate. Researchers said the details revealed by the scans were "extraordinary". Using micro CT scanners, which generate 3D images with 100 times the resolution of medical CT scans, the animals' remains were analysed in previously unseen detail, giving an insight into how they were killed and the ritual behind it. ...
‘Mummified’ plants give glimpse of Earth’s future

‘Mummified’ plants give glimpse of Earth’s future

Science
Fossil leaves from the remains of a 23 million-year-old forest suggest some plants may adapt to grow more quickly as CO2 levels rise, a study says.Scientists recovered the very well-preserved leaves from an ancient lake on New Zealand's South Island.They have enabled the scientists to link for the first time the high temperatures of the period with high levels of atmospheric CO2.The results have been published in the journal Climate of the Past.In their scientific paper, the team shows that some plants were able to harvest carbon dioxide more efficiently for photosynthesis - the biological process that harnesses light from the Sun to produce food for the plant.They say their findings may hold clues for how the dynamics of plant l...