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Tag: Network

SpaceX plans launch to boost Starlink network to nearly 600

SpaceX plans launch to boost Starlink network to nearly 600

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., June 25 (UPI) -- Some internet users will get to test SpaceX's Starlink satellite broadband service soon, as the company prepares another launch in Florida on Thursday that would boost the number of its communications spacecraft in orbit to almost 600. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying about 60 of them is scheduled to lift off Thursday at 4:39 p.m. from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center. The flight also will carry two very small Earth observation satellites for Seattle-based BlackSky Global. Advertisement An outlook for isolated storms Thursday means a 40 percent likelihood of cancellation because of heavy cloud cover and the threat of lightning, according to the U.S. Air Force forecast. A backup launch time would be Friday, also with a 40 percent chance of weather...
SpaceX launch boosts Starlink network to 480 satellites

SpaceX launch boosts Starlink network to 480 satellites

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., June 3 (UPI) -- A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off on time Wednesday night from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, propelling 60 Starlink communications satellites into orbit. The successful launch boosted the number of Starlink satellites circling the Earth to 480, by far the greatest number of any communications network. Advertisement Liftoff at 9:25 p.m. EDT came on a warm, humid night after skies cleared sufficiently to ensure a safe launch and adequate monitoring. At about 2 minutes, 45 seconds after launch, the nine main engines of the rocket's first stage shut off, and that stage re-entered the Earth's atmosphere for recovery off Florida on the SpaceX barge named Just Read the Instructions. The first stage landed mostly inside a bull's-eye on the flat dec...
Nellis AFB to test 5G network beginning in January 2021

Nellis AFB to test 5G network beginning in January 2021

Business
May 28 (UPI) -- The Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering and the U.S. Air Force Warfare Center are working together to build a fifth-generation, or 5G, cellular network, for testing at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, according to the Pentagon. "The Defense Department recognizes 5G technology is vital to maintaining America's military and economic advantages," Dr. Joseph Evans, DOD technical director for 5G and the lead for the department's 5G development effort, said Thursday in a press release. Advertisement "We expect to start construction on the network at Nellis in July and have it fully operational in January of next year," Evans said. According to the Department of Defense, the network will feature relocatable cell towers that can be set up and take...
BT delays removal of Huawei from EE’s core network by two years

BT delays removal of Huawei from EE’s core network by two years

Technology
Huawei's involvement in the most sensitive parts of EE's mobile network is to continue longer than planned.In December 2018, owner BT said it would take just two years to remove Huawei equipment from its core network.But it now says "100% of core mobile traffic" will be on its new Ericsson-built equipment by 2023, the government deadline announced in January 2020.And it blames the government for also ruling 65% of the network's periphery must be rid of Huawei equipment too. What is the 5G core and why is it important?A mobile phone network's core is sometimes likened to its heart or brain.It is where voice and other data is routed across various sub-networks and computer servers to ensure it reac...
Wireless network helps scientists track small animals

Wireless network helps scientists track small animals

Science
April 2 (UPI) -- Researchers have developed a wireless network capable of tracking small animals tagged with sensors. The new technology -- described Thursday in the journal PLOS Biology -- could help scientists compile tracking data for local populations of small animals without relying on heavy transmitters and satellite communication systems. Automated tracking methods have made it much easier for scientists to study the behavior and migration patterns of animals species, but monitoring smaller animals still presents problems. Many tracking sensors are too heavy for smaller bird and mammal species, which account for the majority of the animal kingdom. Additionally, the use of satellite communication systems for the retrieval of local tracking data requires significant amounts of energ...