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Tag: networks

Mobile networks to make Oak lessons site data-free

Mobile networks to make Oak lessons site data-free

Technology
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Social networks explain why independent cultures interpret the world in similar ways

Social networks explain why independent cultures interpret the world in similar ways

Science
Jan. 13 (UPI) -- How can cultures that developed on opposite sides of the world come to similar understandings about colors, shapes, familial relationships and other categorical systems? The traditional explanation for this cross-cultural continuity is that humans are born with categories wired into their brains. Advertisement Researchers with the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, however, have an alternative explanation. It's not the human brain, exactly, that yields categorical consensus across disparate groups, researchers contend in a new paper, published in the journal Nature Communications, but the dynamics of consensus building among large groups of people. The phenomenon of "category convergence" has long been recognized by archaeologists in th...
Nashville bombing spotlights vulnerable voice, data networks

Nashville bombing spotlights vulnerable voice, data networks

Technology
PHOENIX -- The Christmas Day bombing in downtown Nashville led to phone and data service outages and disruptions over hundreds of miles in the southern U.S., raising new concerns about the vulnerability of U.S. communications.The blast seriously damaged a key AT&T network facility, an important hub that provides local wireless, internet and video service and connects to regional networks. Backup generators went down, which took service out hours after the blast. A fire broke out and forced an evacuation. The building flooded, with more than three feet of water later pumped out of the basement; AT&T and said there was still water on the second floor as of Monday.The immediate repercussions were surprisingly widespread. AT&T customers lost service — phones, intern
Hacked networks will need to be burned ‘down to the ground’

Hacked networks will need to be burned ‘down to the ground’

Technology
BOSTON -- It’s going to take months to kick elite hackers widely believed to be Russian out of the U.S. government networks they have been quietly rifling through since as far back as March in Washington’s worst cyberespionage failure on record.Experts say there simply are not enough skilled threat-hunting teams to duly identify all the government and private-sector systems that may have been hacked. FireEye, the cybersecurity company that discovered the intrusion into U.S. agencies and was among the victims, has already tallied dozens of casualties. It's racing to identify more.“We have a serious problem. We don’t know what networks they are in, how deep they are, what access they have, what tools they left,” said Bruce Schneier, a prominent security expert and Harvard fellow.It’s not cle
Grooming behavior reveals complex social networks among dairy cows

Grooming behavior reveals complex social networks among dairy cows

Science
Aug. 4 (UPI) -- By tracking the grooming behaviors of dairy cows, researchers have gained new insights into the formation and evolution of social networks among cows, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science . Social grooming among animals is called allogrooming. Among bovine, allogrooming typically involves one cow licking the head and neck of another. Advertisement Researchers estimate allogrooming works to strengthen bonds between individual animals, as well as enhance cohesion among the herd. The nuances of these processes, however, are not well documented in cows. For nearly a month, an international team of researchers from Chile and the United States recorded 1,329 allogrooming events involving 38 different cows at an agricultural resear...