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Tag: Neuroscientists

Neuroscientists watch brains replay memories in real time

Neuroscientists watch brains replay memories in real time

Science
March 6 (UPI) -- In a new study, scientists successfully observed the neural signatures of recalled memories in real time. For the study, researchers at the National Institutes of Health monitored the neural activity of epilepsy patients while they learned word pairings. Scientists spotted the electrical signature of a forming memory as patients first learned a word pairing. Then, during follow up tests, researchers were able to recognize the same neural patterns just before patients recalled what they had learned earlier. The electrodes and word tests allowed scientists to watch the electrical signal sparked by a replayed memory in a real time. The study, published this week in the journal Science, was part of a broader effort to develop new therapies for patients with drug-resistant ep...
Neuroscientists build model to identify internal brain states

Neuroscientists build model to identify internal brain states

Science
Nov. 25 (UPI) -- How humans respond to stimuli depends on not only external factors, but internal variables like mood and memory, as well. These internal brain states are invisible to the outside observer, but neuroscientists have developed a new model to predict internal brain states based on observations of outward behavior. For now, the model only works to predict the internal states of fruit flies, but it could eventually be used to better understand the relationship between human brain states and behavior. During a previous study, scientists were able to predict a portion of a male fruit fly's singing behavior by observing the insect's behavior. With the help of the new model, scientists can more accurately predict the fruit fly's seduction methods. "By estimating the fly's interna...
Neuroscientists identify the origins of 'free will' inside the brain

Neuroscientists identify the origins of 'free will' inside the brain

Science
Oct. 2 (UPI) -- Neuroscientists have pinpointed the origin of "free will" inside the human brain. Whether or not free will exists -- or whether such a distinction is meaningful -- will remain a point of contention among priests and philosophers. What matters to neuroscientists is the interpretation, or perception, of free will. And for the first time, scientists have identified its cognitive origins. Scientists define free will as the combination of volition, the will to act and agency, a sense of responsibility for one's actions. Through an analysis method called brain lesion network mapping, scientists were able to pinpoint the origins of the two cognitive processes responsible for the perception of free will. "Lesion network mapping is a recently validated technique that allows scient...