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Economist finds out about Nobel win when neighbour knocks on the door

Economist finds out about Nobel win when neighbour knocks on the door

Technology
Receiving an unexpected knock on the front door in the early hours of the morning does not usually bring good news - but it is how one man found out he had won a Nobel Prize. Economist Paul Milgrom won the prize for economics alongside his colleague Robert Wilson for their work benefitting sellers, buyers and taxpayers around the world. But the prize's organisers had been unable to reach Mr Milgrom, so Mr Wilson took it upon himself to let his colleague know about their win."You know, I was asleep and my phone is set not to take calls from unknown numbers," Mr Milgrom said. "So, they never got through to me."But there came to be a knock at my door and my co-winner, Bob Wilson, who also lives across the street, came over and was knocking at my door and saying, 'Paul, wake up! You've wo...
World Food Programme wins Nobel Peace Prize

World Food Programme wins Nobel Peace Prize

World
The World Food Programme has won this year's Nobel Peace Prize for its efforts to combat hunger and its contribution to improving conditions for peace in conflict-affected areas.The Rome-based UN agency has also been a driving force in trying to prevent the use of hunger as a weapon of war and conflict. The WFP says it helps tens of millions of people in about 88 countries each year, and that one in nine people worldwide still do not have enough to eat. Image: The UN agency was honoured for its contribution to bettering conditions for peace in conflict-affected areas The head of the programme, David Beasley, said he was left speechless by the award."I think this is the first time in my life I've been without words," he said. "I was ju...
Nobel Peace Prize goes to UN World Food Programme

Nobel Peace Prize goes to UN World Food Programme

World
The 2020 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) for its efforts to combat hunger. The Norwegian Nobel Committee said the WFP had acted "as a driving force in efforts to prevent the use of hunger as a weapon of war and conflict". The prize is worth 10m Swedish krona ($ 1.1m; £872,600).The WFP, the 101st winner of the prize, said it was "deeply humbled"."This is in recognition of the work of WFP staff who put their lives on the line every day to bring food and assistance to more than 100 million hungry children, women and men across the world," it said on Twitter. WFP head David Beasley told the Associated Press news agency it was "the first time in my life I've been without words". Yem
Scientists win historic Nobel chemistry prize for ‘genetic scissors’

Scientists win historic Nobel chemistry prize for ‘genetic scissors’

Science
Two scientists have been awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the tools to edit DNA.Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna are the first two women to share the prize, which honours their work on the technology of genome editing. Their discovery, known as Crispr-Cas9 "genetic scissors", is a way of making specific and precise changes to the DNA contained in living cells.They will split the prize money of 10 million krona (£861,200; $ 1,110,400).Biological chemist Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede, commented: "The ability to cut DNA where you want has revolutionised the life sciences."Not only has the women's technology been transformative for basic research, it could also be used to treat inherited illnesses.Prof
Nobel Prize for chemistry awarded for ‘genome scissors’

Nobel Prize for chemistry awarded for ‘genome scissors’

Technology
French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer AByThe Associated PressOctober 7, 2020, 10:14 AM• 2 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleSTOCKHOLM -- French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to “molecular scissors” that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases.The recipients were announced Wednesday in Stockholm by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.“There is enormous power in this genetic tool, which affects us all,” said Claes Gustafsson, chair of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry. "It has not only revolutionised basic science, but also resulted in innovative crops and will lead to ground-breaking new medical treatments.