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Tag: Nutrition

Wildlife biodiversity is a boon to human health, seafood nutrition

Wildlife biodiversity is a boon to human health, seafood nutrition

Science
April 5 (UPI) -- Biodiversity provides human health benefits on the land and in the water, according to a pair of newly published studies. Previous studies have highlighted many of the ways biodiversity offers indirect benefits to human health -- by encouraging pollination, for example. But new research suggests biodiversity also provides direct health benefits by keeping humans from getting sick. Advertisement According to one new study, published Monday in the journal PNAS, biodiversity helps minimize the risk of zoonotic disease outbreaks. "There's a persistent myth that wild areas with high levels of biodiversity are hotspots for disease," lead study author Felicia Keesing said in a press release. "More animal diversity must equal more dangerous pathogens. But this turns out to be wr...
Personalized nutrition could be the next plant-based meat, worth $64 billion by 2040, says UBS

Personalized nutrition could be the next plant-based meat, worth $64 billion by 2040, says UBS

Finance
Nestle Health LabImagine receiving customized nutrition advice based on your personal biologic or genetic profile. That's the "future of food," according to a UBS analyst, who sees diet personalization as the next plant-based meat.Personalized nutrition could generate annual revenues as high as $ 64 billion by 2040, the firm said. Plus, big-name companies such as Apple, Uber and Amazon could benefit from the massive growth opportunity."With heightened health awareness among consumers, yet also more people suffering from ailments which are attributable to poor nutrition, there is growing demand for solutions that can improve individual nutritional choices," said UBS analyst Charles Eden in a note to clients on Tuesday. "Personalised nutrition ... represents a potential such solution."P...
Climate change is robbing rice of its nutrition

Climate change is robbing rice of its nutrition

Science
May 25 (UPI) -- As carbon dioxide concentrations in Earth's atmosphere increase, the nutritional value of rice will decline, new research shows. Researchers with the University of Tokyo tracked rice growth at experimental field sites across Japan and China. A system of pipes delivered different levels of CO2 to the rice plants. Wind sensors and gas detectors helped scientists ensure each plant was exposed to the correct amount of CO2. Scientists analyzed rice samples from the experimental plants, measuring the amounts of iron, zinc, protein, and vitamins B1, B2, B5, and B9 found in each. Their data revealed an inverse relationship between CO2 levels and nutritional qualities -- the higher the CO2 level, the lower the levels of vitamins and minerals. Researchers published the findings thi...
5 Dietitians on the One Nutrition Tweak You Should Make

5 Dietitians on the One Nutrition Tweak You Should Make

Health
Eating healthy doesn't have to be hard. For many people, “eating better” is an intimidating and abstract concept. What counts as healthy? Is calorie counting necessary? Is all junk food off limits?This confusion is familiar to many people, but improving your nutrition doesn’t always have to mean a diet overhaul. In fact, sometimes small changes can make the biggest impact. In honor of National Nutrition Month this March, TIME asked registered dietitians for five quick and easy diet resets that will put you on the path to better health.Embrace fat.“Most people think all fats can negatively impact health. But in reality, unsaturated fats—monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, i.e. omega-3 fatty acids—are known as the “good fats” and have been shown to reduce inflamma...