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Tag: Ocean

No serious injuries initially reported as Boeing 737 lands in ocean near Micronesia

No serious injuries initially reported as Boeing 737 lands in ocean near Micronesia

World
No serious injuries were reported among those traveling on a Boeing 737 that landed about 150 yards short of a runway off the coast of Micronesia, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Air Niugini, the official state airline of Papua New Guinea, confirmed in a statement that the aircraft "landed short of the runway whilst landing at Chuuk Island of the Federated States of Micronesia this morning." "Air Niugini can confirm that all on board were able to safely evacuate the aircraft," the statement continued. "The airline is making all efforts to ensure the safety and immediate needs of our passengers and crew. Further information will be provided as it becomes available." The jet contained 35 passengers and 12 crew members, according to Jimmy Emilio, the airport manager of...
Sailor injured during solo race rescued in Indian Ocean

Sailor injured during solo race rescued in Indian Ocean

World
A sailor who suffered a crippling back injury during a solo round-the-world race has been rescued in the Indian Ocean. Abhilash Tomy was rescued by a French fishing vessel, Osiris, on Monday amid an international effort coordinated by Australia.The 39-year-old skipper injured his back badly and was unable to move after a storm rolled his boat 360 degrees during the Golden Globe Race on Friday.Both masts on his 36ft-long (11m) classic yacht, Thuriya, were taken down by the storm and were seen hanging over the vessel's side. Mr Tomy, who is also an Indian naval officer, had been coming third out of 18 participants before the severe storm and survived on cans of iced tea.Indian navy spokesman Captain DK Sharma told Sky News: "He is conscious, he can talk, he's been rescued."...
Truman, Lincoln strike groups train together in western Atlantic Ocean

Truman, Lincoln strike groups train together in western Atlantic Ocean

Business
Aug. 31 (UPI) -- The Nimitz-class USS Harry S. Truman and USS Abraham Lincoln began dual-carrier qualification operations Wednesday in the western Atlantic Ocean, the U.S. Navy announced this week. "By training and operating together, the USS Harry S. Truman and USS Abraham Lincoln strike groups enhance combat readiness and interoperability, and also demonstrate the inherent flexibility and scalability of carrier strike groups," Rear Adm. Gene Black, commander of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Commander, said in a press release. "The opportunity to conduct complex, multi-unit training better prepares us to answer our nation's call to carry out a full range of missions, at anytime, anywhere around the globe," Black said. The operations include a war-at-sea exercise with strike an...
Seagrass can provide localized protection against ocean acidification

Seagrass can provide localized protection against ocean acidification

Science
July 31 (UPI) -- Seagrass could serve as a local buffer against ocean acidification, protecting vulnerable species against rising levels of carbonic acid. In addition to providing food and shelter to a variety of marine organisms, seagrass also absorbs carbon dioxide as it performs photosynthesis. Researchers with the Carnegie Institution for Science designed to models to measure whether a seagrass meadow's carbon uptake abilities could lower pH levels. The models accounted for grass density, photosynthetic activity, water depth, currents and a variety of other factors. The results, detailed in the journal Ecological Applications, suggests seagrass can have a small, local effect on ocean acidity. "Local stakeholders, such as California's shellfish industry, want to know whether seagrass m...
Increase in size, frequency of ocean storms a threat to global fisheries

Increase in size, frequency of ocean storms a threat to global fisheries

Science
June 25 (UPI) -- Fishermen around the world will face an influx of larger, more powerful ocean storms, new research suggests. In an effort to understand how global warming and its resulting shifts in weather patterns could influence global fisheries, scientists at the University of Exeter analyzed predictions made by a variety of climate change models. Many studies have suggested rising atmospheric and ocean temperatures, as well as a slowdown in atmospheric currents, will inspire more frequent and larger storms, especially ocean and coastal storms. The latest study -- published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change -- showed an uptick in large storms is likely to make fishing more dangerous. Larger storms could also damage fish habitat and disrupt fish breeding grounds. "Storms ar...