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Tag: Ocean

Seagrass can provide localized protection against ocean acidification

Seagrass can provide localized protection against ocean acidification

Science
July 31 (UPI) -- Seagrass could serve as a local buffer against ocean acidification, protecting vulnerable species against rising levels of carbonic acid. In addition to providing food and shelter to a variety of marine organisms, seagrass also absorbs carbon dioxide as it performs photosynthesis. Researchers with the Carnegie Institution for Science designed to models to measure whether a seagrass meadow's carbon uptake abilities could lower pH levels. The models accounted for grass density, photosynthetic activity, water depth, currents and a variety of other factors. The results, detailed in the journal Ecological Applications, suggests seagrass can have a small, local effect on ocean acidity. "Local stakeholders, such as California's shellfish industry, want to know whether seagrass m...
Increase in size, frequency of ocean storms a threat to global fisheries

Increase in size, frequency of ocean storms a threat to global fisheries

Science
June 25 (UPI) -- Fishermen around the world will face an influx of larger, more powerful ocean storms, new research suggests. In an effort to understand how global warming and its resulting shifts in weather patterns could influence global fisheries, scientists at the University of Exeter analyzed predictions made by a variety of climate change models. Many studies have suggested rising atmospheric and ocean temperatures, as well as a slowdown in atmospheric currents, will inspire more frequent and larger storms, especially ocean and coastal storms. The latest study -- published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change -- showed an uptick in large storms is likely to make fishing more dangerous. Larger storms could also damage fish habitat and disrupt fish breeding grounds. "Storms ar...
Study reveals missing drivers of ocean deoxygenation

Study reveals missing drivers of ocean deoxygenation

Science
June 11 (UPI) -- Over the last 50 years, the amount of oxygen in the world's oceans has declined by 2 percent. Models designed to simulate the phenomenon, however, have failed to reproduce such significant losses. Now, scientists have identified the blind spots in current models, as well as drivers of ocean deoxygenation ignored or underestimated by popular simulations. One of the biggest drivers of ocean deoxygenation is global warming. As increases in the amount of CO2 have encouraged a greenhouse gas effect, heating the atmosphere, the ocean has warmed, too. Warmer water can't absorb as much gas. Rising ocean temperatures can explain approximately 20 percent of the ocean deoxygenation measured over the last half-century, and the current computer models account for this type of oxygen ...
Margaret Atwood: 'If the ocean dies, so do we'

Margaret Atwood: 'If the ocean dies, so do we'

Science
The celebrated author Margaret Atwood has told a conference that humanity's future is linked to the survival of ocean ecosystems.Commenting on ocean plastic pollution, she said: "Something has to be done... If the ocean dies; end of us." Ms Atwood was speaking at the Under Her Eye summit in London.The conference, held at the British Library, also heard that climate change disproportionately affects women on a global scale.In addition, their voices are "too rarely heard" in top level climate change discussions.Aiming to tackle key environmental issues "from a female perspective", the event hosted a range of policy makers, artists and scientists.Having written frequently in her novels about the impacts of climate change, Ms Atwood described the conditions w...
Plumes of ocean spray are emanating from Jupiter's moon Europa

Plumes of ocean spray are emanating from Jupiter's moon Europa

Science
May 14 (UPI) -- New research offers additional evidence of plumes emanating from Europa's subsurface ocean. Images captured by the Hubble Telescope have previously suggested the presence of ocean plumes ejected through tissues in the icy crust of Jupiter's moon. Some astronomers were skeptical of the Hubble results, however. The newest proof was discovered among data collected by the Galileo mission in 1997 during a Europa flyby. Scientists detailed the new proof in a paper published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy. Scientists with the Cassini mission were able to identify water plumes protruding from Saturn's moon Enceladus by measuring perturbations in the magnetic fields surrounding the satellite. Molecules and atoms ejected in a watery plume quickly become ionized as solar win...