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Tag: oceans

Ocean noise: Study to measure the oceans’ ‘year of quiet’

Ocean noise: Study to measure the oceans’ ‘year of quiet’

Science
AlamyOcean scientists around the world are studying the "unique moment" of quiet created by the pandemic. The researchers have called their vast listening experiment: The year of the quiet ocean. "Lockdown slowed global shipping on a scale that would otherwise be impossible," explained Prof Peter Tyack from the University of St Andrews. The scientists plan to listen to the ocean soundscape before, during and after lockdown. They have identified 200 ocean hydrophones - underwater microphones that are already in place around the global ocean. "So the idea is to use those to measure the changes in noise and how they affect marine life - like calling whales or fish choruses," Prof Tyack said. "Just like people and cities may have noticed that, with much less traffic noise and human activity, ...
Sentinel-6 satellite to help NASA track climate change’s effects on Earth’s oceans

Sentinel-6 satellite to help NASA track climate change’s effects on Earth’s oceans

Science
Nov. 20 (UPI) -- While NASA has been using satellites to measure the height of the ocean for the last 28 years, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite is slated to offer greater precision than ever before. Sentinel-6, jointly developed by NASA, the European Space Agency, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites and NOAA, is set to launch Saturday at 12:17p.m. EST from Space Launch Complex 4 East at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Advertisement The satellite will use a trio of instruments to calculate its position and distance above the ocean's surface as the satellite follows its polar orbit. "It's going to be a new star in the sky, giving us the best possible measurements of sea level rise, ocean waves and wind," Craig Donlon, Sentinel-6 mis...
Europe, US ‘climate guardian’ satellite to monitor oceans

Europe, US ‘climate guardian’ satellite to monitor oceans

Technology
A satellite developed by Europe and the United States set for launching this weekend will greatly help scientists keep track of global sea level rise, one of the most daunting effects of climate changeBy FRANK JORDANS Associated PressNovember 20, 2020, 9:27 PM• 4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleBERLIN -- A "climate guardian" satellite set for launching this weekend will greatly help scientists keep track of the rise in sea levels, one of the most daunting effects of global warming, a senior official at the European Space Agency said Friday.The satellite, known as Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich and jointly developed by Europe and the United States, contains cutting-edge instruments able to capture sea surface height with unprecedented accuracy, adding to space-based ...
Climate change: Oceans running out of oxygen as temperatures rise

Climate change: Oceans running out of oxygen as temperatures rise

Science
Climate change and nutrient pollution are driving the oxygen from our oceans, and threatening many species of fish.That's the conclusion of the biggest study of its kind, undertaken by conservation group IUCN.While nutrient run-off has been known for decades, researchers say that climate change is making the lack of oxygen worse. Around 700 ocean sites are now suffering from low oxygen, compared with 45 in the 1960s. Researchers say the depletion is threatening species including tuna, marlin and sharks.The threat to oceans from nutrient run-off of chemicals such as nitrogen and phosphorus from farms and industry has long been known to impact the levels of oxygen in the sea waters and still remains the primary factor, especially closer to coasts.However, i...
Climate change severely damaging world’s oceans, major new report warns

Climate change severely damaging world’s oceans, major new report warns

Science
Climate change is devastating our seas and frozen regions as never before, a major new United Nations report warns.According to a UN panel of scientists, waters are rising, the ice is melting, and species are moving habitat due to human activities.And the loss of permanently frozen lands threatens to unleash even more carbon, hastening the decline.There is some guarded hope that the worst impacts can be avoided, with deep and immediate cuts to carbon emissions.This is the third in a series of special reports that have been produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) over the past 12 months. Media playback is unsupported on your device The scientists previously lo...