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Tag: pain

Pop star Sia reveals battle with chronic pain disorder

Pop star Sia reveals battle with chronic pain disorder

Entertainment
Australian pop star Sia has revealed that she suffers from a neurological disease that gives her chronic pain.In a tweet, the singer-songwriter said she had Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), a rare condition that can cause joint pain and extreme fatigue.Sia, 43, is known for being secretive about her life, and regularly hides her face under wigs and headgear.She has had a string of solo hits and has written other songs for Rihanna, Beyonce, Katy Perry and Adele.The greatest 9 moments of Sia's career"I just wanted to say to those of you suffering from pain, whether physical or emotional, I love you, keep going," Sia tweeted on Friday. "Pain is demoralizing, and you're not alone".According to the UK's National Health Service there are ...
Vet says badger culls caused ‘immense pain’

Vet says badger culls caused ‘immense pain’

Science
Up to 9,000 of badgers are likely to have suffered "immense pain" in culls to control cattle TB, according to a former government adviser.Prof Ranald Munro is the ex-Chair of an independent expert group appointed by the government to assess its trials.He has written to Natural England to say that the policy is causing "huge suffering".He adds that the culls are not reducing TB in cattle and in one area the incidence of the disease has gone up.The culls began in 2012 following appeals from cattle farmers whose livelihoods are continuing to be damaged by the spread of TB. Prof Munro's independent expert group found that up 23% of badgers took more than five minutes to die after they were shot. These figures prompted the group to conclude that the culls were...
Women in labour given virtual reality to ease pain of childbirth

Women in labour given virtual reality to ease pain of childbirth

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device Women in labour are being given virtual reality headsets to see if they can help manage the pain of childbirth.University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff is carrying out a trial and it could be rolled out across Wales, if successful.Midwife Suzanne Hardacre, said the technology offered an alternative for pain management.Mother-to-be Hannah Lelii, who tested the kit ahead of the birth of her first baby this month, likened it "to a simulator"."It's genuinely 360 degrees, so when I turn, I've got the view that would be behind me or to the side of me," she said. "It helps to get me in a state of relaxation."The health board will arrange a feedback session in future to gauge the response of the first raft o...

Some Alaskans feeling pain of Medicaid dental cuts

Health
Budget vetoes by Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy eliminated Medicaid dental coverage for adults — a $ 27 million cut that is having an impact. KTUU reports that Michael Shelden had plans to get dentures after having all his teeth pulled following years of dental pain. The plan fell through after the governor's veto, and Shelden said he can't afford the $ 2,000 down payment to proceed with his plan. "I cried," he said. "I wake up and I cry at night." Now, he is only eating soft food such as soup and baked potatoes. The Alaska Dental Society calls the budget cut disappointing, saying the coverage aims to treat problems before they reach costly proportions. "By treating cavities and gum disease early Medicaid recipients are able to avoid more costly treatment or if the cavity reaches the stage o
Insects experience chronic pain in the wake of injuries

Insects experience chronic pain in the wake of injuries

Science
July 12 (UPI) -- Insects can feel chronic pain, too, according to a new study. Even after an injury is healed, researchers found insects continue to experience pain. Chronic pain comes in two forms: inflammatory and neuropathic. For the study, scientists looked at neuropathic pain, caused by nerve damage, in fruit flies. In the lab, scientists damaged a nerve in one of the legs of a fly. Researchers allowed the injury to fully heal before subjecting the fruit fly to a series of tests. The experiments showed the leg remained hypersensitive for some time, even though the injury had healed. "After the animal is hurt once badly, they are hypersensitive and try to protect themselves for the rest of their lives," Greg Neely, an associate professor of environmental sciences at the University of...