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Tag: pain

Insects experience chronic pain in the wake of injuries

Insects experience chronic pain in the wake of injuries

Science
July 12 (UPI) -- Insects can feel chronic pain, too, according to a new study. Even after an injury is healed, researchers found insects continue to experience pain. Chronic pain comes in two forms: inflammatory and neuropathic. For the study, scientists looked at neuropathic pain, caused by nerve damage, in fruit flies. In the lab, scientists damaged a nerve in one of the legs of a fly. Researchers allowed the injury to fully heal before subjecting the fruit fly to a series of tests. The experiments showed the leg remained hypersensitive for some time, even though the injury had healed. "After the animal is hurt once badly, they are hypersensitive and try to protect themselves for the rest of their lives," Greg Neely, an associate professor of environmental sciences at the University of...
Chronic pain given as top reason for using medical marijuana

Chronic pain given as top reason for using medical marijuana

Health
Chronic pain is the most common reason people give when they enroll in state-approved medical marijuana programs. That's followed by stiffness from multiple sclerosis and chemotherapy-related nausea, according to an analysis of 15 states published Monday in the journal Health Affairs. The study didn't measure whether marijuana actually helped anyone with their problems, but the patients' reasons match up with what's known about the science of marijuana and its chemical components. "The majority of patients for whom we have data are using cannabis for reasons where the science is the strongest," said lead author Kevin Boehnke of University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. California became the first state to allow medical use of marijuana in 1996. More than 30 states now allow marijuana for doze...
Medications may not heal long-term knee pain, study says

Medications may not heal long-term knee pain, study says

Health
Dec. 21 (UPI) -- Drugs long thought to soothe long-term knee pain may not actually work, a study says. The research, published Friday in JAMA, come from 47 trials over the course of a year. The work found that only two drugs had any level of significant effectiveness, even though those drugs were only mildly successful. "This is the first meta-analysis in osteoarthritis (OA) that takes into account only long-term (defined as at least 12-month duration) clinical trials," Lucio Rovati, a researcher at Department of Medicine and Surgery and study author, told UPI in an email interview. "Analysis of long-term data is particularly important because OA (knee OA in our case, i.e. the most common form and joint localization of OA) is a chronic and progressive disease, but most medications are stu...
Patients shocked, burned by device touted to treat pain

Patients shocked, burned by device touted to treat pain

Health
Desperate for relief after years of agony, Jim Taft listened intently as his pain management doctor described a medical device that could change his life. It wouldn't fix the nerve damage in his mangled right arm, Taft and his wife recalled the doctor saying, but a spinal-cord stimulator would cloak his pain, making him "good as new." But Taft's surgically implanted stimulator failed when a wire along his spine broke. After an operation to repair it, he said the device shocked him so many times that he couldn't sleep and even fell down a flight of stairs. Today, the 45-year-old Taft is a prisoner in his own bed, barely able to get to the bathroom by himself. "I thought I would have a wonderful life," he said. "But look at me." For years, medical device companies and doctors have touted s...
Medical marijuana increases pain threshold for patients

Medical marijuana increases pain threshold for patients

Health
Sept. 18 (UPI) -- Drugs derived from an active ingredient in marijuana produced only modest increases in pain threshold and tolerance but no reduction in ongoing intensity, according to an analysis of research. Researchers examined 18 placebo-controlled studies in determining the effectiveness of cannabidiol, which contains less than 0.1 percent of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the psychoactive substance in marijuana that makes users high. The findings were published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The researchers concluded that cannabis-induced improvements in pain-related situations "may underlie the widely held belief that cannabis relieves pain." "Cannabinoid drugs are widely used as analgesics [painkillers], but experimental pain studies have produced mi...