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Tag: patients

Taxpayer-funded drugs 'too expensive for patients’

Taxpayer-funded drugs 'too expensive for patients’

Health
Taxpayer-funded medical research is producing medicines which are increasingly unaffordable for patients who need them, says a new report.Campaigners claim that the NHS spent more than £1bn on drugs developed from publically funded research in 2016.But the UK pharmaceutical industry said the main driver of price was the value of drugs to patients.A government spokesperson said: "We want the UK to continue to be a global leader in research and development."They added that the government was committed to ensuring patients could access the effective medicines they needed, at a price that represented value for the NHS and for taxpayers. A new report, seen by 5 live Investigates, claims that UK taxpayers and patients worldwide are being denied the medicines they need, despite the public sector
Almost a quarter of dialysis patients back in hospital in 30 days

Almost a quarter of dialysis patients back in hospital in 30 days

Health
SATURDAY, Sept. 30, 2017 -- Nearly one-quarter of kidney dialysis patients admitted to the hospital are readmitted within 30 days after discharge, a new study finds. In many cases, the readmissions are for a different problem than the one that led to the first hospitalization, according to the report.For the study, researchers reviewed data from nearly 391,000 initial hospitalizations of dialysis patients in the United States in 2013. Within 30 days after leaving the hospital, 22 percent of the patients had unplanned readmissions. Only 20 percent of those readmissions were for the same diagnosis as the first admission, the findings showed.Just 2 percent of all patients accounted for 20 percent of all readmissions. Women and younger people were more likely to be readmitted, the research...
Study: Viagra may harm, not help, patients with heart valve disorder

Study: Viagra may harm, not help, patients with heart valve disorder

Health
TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 -- When one of the heart's valves goes awry, this can lead to dangerously high blood pressure in the nearby lungs.Recent studies have suggested that the impotence drug Viagra (sildenafil) might help ease the problem, known as "pulmonary hypertension linked to valvular heart disease."But new research suggests the medicine might do the opposite -- raising patients' heart risks instead.In what he called a "surprise" finding, "six-month treatment with sildenafil leads to worse clinical outcomes than placebo," said lead researcher Dr. Javier Bermejo, a cardiologist at University Gregorio Maranon General Hospital in Madrid, Spain.The bottom line, he said: "Long-term usage of sildenafil for treating residual pulmonary hypertension in patients with valvular heart disease sho...
Autism patients: GPs in England urged to keep register

Autism patients: GPs in England urged to keep register

Health
GPs in England are being encouraged to keep a register of patients with autism in order to improve the care they receive.Health chiefs say a register would alert GPs to the specific needs of adults and children with autism and help tailor services for them.The National Autistic Society said it would "help improve the health and wellbeing of autistic people".But getting a quick diagnosis was still an issue, a child autism charity said.Autism is a lifelong, developmental disability that affects how a person communicates with and relates to other people, and how they experience the world around them.GPs in England already keep a register of patients with learning disabilities, and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence thinks patients with autism should be easily identified by ...
Canadian ex-nurse gets life in prison for killing eight elderly patients

Canadian ex-nurse gets life in prison for killing eight elderly patients

World
June 27 (UPI) -- A former nurse in Canada has been sentenced to life without parole for murdering eight seniors by injecting them with insulin for no medical purpose."I caused tremendous pain and suffering and death.... Sorry is much too small a word. I am extremely sorry," said Elizabeth Wettlaufer, 50, to an Ontario court.Wettlaufer pled guilty to eight first-degree murder charges, four counts of attempted murder and two counts of aggravated assault.Wettlaufer began her violent crime spree in 2007, when she injected two seniors, one 87 and the other 91, with insulin injections. Those first attempts did not kill the victims, but accounted for her two aggravated assault charges.Later that year, she got her first kill via lethal insulin injection, taking the life of 84-year-old James (Jim) ...