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Tag: patients

AI early diagnosis could save heart and cancer patients

AI early diagnosis could save heart and cancer patients

Science
Researchers at an Oxford hospital have developed artificial intelligence (AI) that can diagnose scans for heart disease and lung cancer.The systems will save billions of pounds by enabling the diseases to be picked up much earlier. The heart disease technology will start to be available to NHS hospitals for free this summer.The government's healthcare tsar, Sir John Bell, has told BBC News that AI could "save the NHS"."There is about £2.2bn spent on pathology services in the NHS. You may be able to reduce that by 50%. AI may be the thing that saves the NHS," he said.RecommendationCurrently cardiologists can tell from the timing of the heartbeat in scans if there is a problem. But even the best doctors get it wrong in one in five cases. Patients are either sent home and have a heart attack
Doctor accused in deaths of 5 patients from opioid overdoses

Doctor accused in deaths of 5 patients from opioid overdoses

Health
A Pennsylvania doctor who prescribed nearly 3 million doses of opioids during a recent 19-month period has been charged with causing the overdose deaths of five people, federal prosecutors said Thursday. The U.S. attorney's office in Harrisburg said Dr. Raymond Kraynak, 60, of Mount Carmel, was indicted on five counts of drug delivery resulting in death, 12 counts of unlawful distribution of a controlled substance and two counts of using his doctor's offices as "drug-involved premises." Prosecutors said a state monitoring program identified Kraynak as having issued the most opioid prescriptions of any physician in Pennsylvania over the 19 months that ended in July. Authorities did not disclose the names of the five patients but said they died between 2013 and 2015. A federal public defend...
Taxpayer-funded drugs 'too expensive for patients’

Taxpayer-funded drugs 'too expensive for patients’

Health
Taxpayer-funded medical research is producing medicines which are increasingly unaffordable for patients who need them, says a new report.Campaigners claim that the NHS spent more than £1bn on drugs developed from publically funded research in 2016.But the UK pharmaceutical industry said the main driver of price was the value of drugs to patients.A government spokesperson said: "We want the UK to continue to be a global leader in research and development."They added that the government was committed to ensuring patients could access the effective medicines they needed, at a price that represented value for the NHS and for taxpayers. A new report, seen by 5 live Investigates, claims that UK taxpayers and patients worldwide are being denied the medicines they need, despite the public sector
Almost a quarter of dialysis patients back in hospital in 30 days

Almost a quarter of dialysis patients back in hospital in 30 days

Health
SATURDAY, Sept. 30, 2017 -- Nearly one-quarter of kidney dialysis patients admitted to the hospital are readmitted within 30 days after discharge, a new study finds. In many cases, the readmissions are for a different problem than the one that led to the first hospitalization, according to the report.For the study, researchers reviewed data from nearly 391,000 initial hospitalizations of dialysis patients in the United States in 2013. Within 30 days after leaving the hospital, 22 percent of the patients had unplanned readmissions. Only 20 percent of those readmissions were for the same diagnosis as the first admission, the findings showed.Just 2 percent of all patients accounted for 20 percent of all readmissions. Women and younger people were more likely to be readmitted, the research...
Study: Viagra may harm, not help, patients with heart valve disorder

Study: Viagra may harm, not help, patients with heart valve disorder

Health
TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 -- When one of the heart's valves goes awry, this can lead to dangerously high blood pressure in the nearby lungs.Recent studies have suggested that the impotence drug Viagra (sildenafil) might help ease the problem, known as "pulmonary hypertension linked to valvular heart disease."But new research suggests the medicine might do the opposite -- raising patients' heart risks instead.In what he called a "surprise" finding, "six-month treatment with sildenafil leads to worse clinical outcomes than placebo," said lead researcher Dr. Javier Bermejo, a cardiologist at University Gregorio Maranon General Hospital in Madrid, Spain.The bottom line, he said: "Long-term usage of sildenafil for treating residual pulmonary hypertension in patients with valvular heart disease sho...