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1 in 4 hospitalized patients with most severe form of COVID-19 will die, study finds

1 in 4 hospitalized patients with most severe form of COVID-19 will die, study finds

Health
April 2 (UPI) -- About 23% of people hospitalized with COVID-19 experience the most severe form of the disease and roughly one in four of them will die due to its complications, according to a study published Friday by PLOS ONE. An additional 60% suffer from the "normal" symptoms, but still have serious heart and lung complications that carry a 10% risk for death, the data showed. Advertisement Collectively, COVID-19 patients in these two categories are more than seven times as likely to be hospitalized due to the illness and nearly three times as likely to die from it, compared to the 17% percent of patients with mild infections, the researchers said. "Patients do not suffer from COVID-19 in a uniform matter," researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis wro...
Covid: Intensive-care patients moved hundreds of miles

Covid: Intensive-care patients moved hundreds of miles

Health
Two patients were moved to a hospital 300 miles away, because of intensive-care bed shortages during the second UK coronavirus wave, BBC News has learned. An unprecedented 2,300 intensive-care patients moved between UK hospitals from September 2020 to March 2021, in search of beds, data shows. Front-line doctors, speaking for the first time, say these transfers were the only way to care for patients. NHS England said the health service had responded well under intense pressure.In January this year, the UK's four chief medical officers put out a joint statement saying: "Without further action, there is a material risk of the NHS in several areas being overwhelmed."And measures were taken to cope with the increased demand:The number of intensive-care unit (ICU) beds across the UK almost doub...
Cancer patients ‘lack same protection’ after first jab

Cancer patients ‘lack same protection’ after first jab

Health
Getty ImagesCancer patients are much less protected against Covid-19 than other people after one dose of the Pfizer vaccine, the first real-world study in this area suggests.With a 12-week wait for the second dose this could leave them vulnerable, says the King's College London and Francis Crick Institute research team.An early second dose appeared to boost cancer patients' protection.Cancer charities are calling for the vaccine strategy to be reviewed.But Cancer Research UK said the small study had not yet been reviewed by other scientists and people undergoing cancer treatment should continue to follow the advice of their doctors. The government said it was focused on "saving lives" and the antibody response "was only part of the protection provided by the vaccine".About 1.2 million peop...
Study: Mixing brain, nervous system-related drugs risky for dementia patients

Study: Mixing brain, nervous system-related drugs risky for dementia patients

Health
March 9 (UPI) -- Older adults who take three or more drugs for dementia or its complications could accelerate memory loss and declines in thinking ability as a result, according to a study published Tuesday by JAMA. Despite this risk, one in seven adults with dementia in the United Stated who is older than 65 and lives outside of a nursing home takes three or more drugs to treat dementia or related disorders, such as depression, the data showed. Advertisement This so-called "poly-pharmacy," or taking multiple prescription drugs, also can raise the risk for injury and death in the elderly, as some of these medications can cause fatigue, weakness and delirium. "Dementia comes with lots of behavioral issues, from changes in sleep and depression to apathy and withdrawal, and providers, patien...
Hospital costs for substance use patients exceed $13B annually, study finds

Hospital costs for substance use patients exceed $13B annually, study finds

Health
March 5 (UPI) -- The diagnosis and treatment of substance use disorder, as well as the management of related health complications, including overdoses, results in more than $ 13 billion in medical costs annually, an analysis published Friday by JAMA Network Open found. More than half of these costs -- $ 7.6 billion -- were tied to caring for patients with alcohol-related disorders, the data showed. Advertisement Just over $ 2.2 billion was spent on treating patients with health issues related to opioid use, the researchers said. Examples of opioids include "street" drugs such as heroin, as well as prescription pain medications used illegally or inappropriately, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. "U.S. hospitals are seeing a big increase in patients seeking acute treatment...