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New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

Technology
The nation's newest weather satellite, launched less than three months ago, has a serious cooling problem that could affect the quality of its pictures. The trouble is with the GOES-17 satellite's premier instrument for taking images of hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and other natural calamities, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday. The imager's infrared sensors aren't getting properly cooled. Experts are scrambling to understand what went wrong and how to fix it. Officials expect it will take at least a few months to figure out. "As you can imagine, doing this remotely from 22,000 miles below only looking at the on-orbit data is a challenge," said Steve Volz, head of NOAA's satellite and information service. NOAA stresses that three other GOES s...
Thailand arrests U.S. tourists for taking nude photos at Buddhist temple

Thailand arrests U.S. tourists for taking nude photos at Buddhist temple

World
Nov. 30 (UPI) -- Two American tourists in Thailand are facing charges for exposing their buttocks in front of religious temples.Joseph and Travis Dasilva, both 38, were arrested Tuesday after they took photos of themselves with their pants down while standing in front of the Wat Arun, one of Thailand's most famous Buddhist temples. But Thai authorities found the married couple's photos on Instagram and put them on a watchlist. And when they tried to catch their flight at the Bangkok airport to return home, they ended up in a Bangkok jail instead."Once they are through with the charges, the Thai immigration police will revoke their visas and push for deportation," Pol Col Choengron Rimpadee, deputy spokesman of immigration police, told the BBC. "They will also be blacklisted from coming bac...
Giant X-ray camera takes photos of atoms

Giant X-ray camera takes photos of atoms

Technology
An X-ray camera so powerful it can capture images of individual atoms and make movies of chemical reactions has begun operating today.The X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) can flash 27,000 laser beams per second - each one a billion times brighter than that of conventional X-Ray sources.Scientists from eleven countries will use it to research the molecular composition of viruses and cells, and take three-dimensional images of the universe on a nano-molecular scale.It will drive forward international research by filming chemical reactions and by investigating the processes occurring deep inside of planets.Built in an underground facility stretching 3.4km from the German city of Hamburg to the town of Schenefeld, scientists say XFEL "marks the beginning a new era of research in Europe".XFEL s...