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Tag: physics

Nobel physics prize: ‘Ground-breaking’ win for planets and Big Bang

Nobel physics prize: ‘Ground-breaking’ win for planets and Big Bang

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device Three scientists have been awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics for "ground-breaking" discoveries about the Universe.James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz were announced as this year's winners at a ceremony in Stockholm.Peebles was honoured for work on the evolution of the Universe, while Mayor and Queloz won for their discovery of a planet around a Sun-like star.The winners will share the prize money of nine million kronor (£738,000).Reacting to the news, Prof Queloz told BBC News: "It's unbelievable," adding: "Since the discovery 25 years ago, everyone kept telling me: 'It's a Nobel Prize discovery'. And I say: 'Oh yeah, yeah, maybe, whatever.'"But in the intervening years, he more-or-l
Study details the physics of proto-stellar disk formation

Study details the physics of proto-stellar disk formation

Science
Sept. 6 (UPI) -- In studying the movements of a trio of protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud, astronomers have gained new insights into the physical conditions that enable the formation of proto-stellar disks. The basic roadmap for the formation of stellar and planetary systems is well established. Over time, gas and dust in interstellar space coalesce. Eventually, the dense cloud of material collapses under its own gravity. A stellar core forms and, thanks to the conservation of angular momentum, a proto-stellar disk forms. After roughly 100,000 years or more, the star gets dense enough to ignite nuclear fusion. Shortly afterwards, planets form from the proto-stellar disk. But questions remain. The details of how angular momentum enables proto-stellar disk formation remains poorly ...
First woman Physics Nobel winner in 55 years

First woman Physics Nobel winner in 55 years

Science
The Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to a woman for the first time in 55 years.Donna Strickland, from Canada, is only the third woman winner of the award, along with Marie Curie, who won in 1903, and Maria Goeppert-Mayer, who was awarded the prize in 1963.Dr Strickland shares this year's prize with Arthur Ashkin, from the US, and Gerard Mourou, from France.It recognises their discoveries in the field of laser physics.Dr Ashkin developed a laser technique described as optical tweezers, which is used to study biological systems.Drs Mourou and Strickland paved the way for the shortest and most intense laser pulses ever created. They developed a technique called Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA). It has found uses in laser the...
Study details the physics of a café latte

Study details the physics of a café latte

Science
Dec. 13 (UPI) -- New research by scientists sat Princeton University has revealed the physics underlying the delicious layers of a café latte."The structure formation in a latte is surprising because it evolves from the chaotic, initial pouring and mixing of fluids into a very organized, distinct arrangement of layers," researcher Nan Xue said in a news release.Xue is a grad student student working in the lab of Howard Stone, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton.Though inspired by an everyday drink order, Xue's investigation yielded insights into the layering of fluids -- insights that could have a variety of useful applications."From a manufacturing perspective, a single pouring process is much simpler than the traditional sequential stacking of layers in a strat
Chanje Kunda: The poet using pole dancing to explain particle physics

Chanje Kunda: The poet using pole dancing to explain particle physics

Entertainment
Poetry, pole dancing and particle physics don't often meet. But they do in a new theatre show by a performer who wants to reclaim the way the female body is portrayed.Poet, playwright and performance artist Chanje Kunda took lessons in several forms of dance to prepare for her latest one-woman show Superposition - ballet dancing, contemporary dancing, pole dancing and lap dancing.The latter two are normally performed in certain clubs for certain men, but Kunda is reinventing them for her own positive purpose."I wanted to explore female sensuality and eroticism because female sensuality within the media has been commodified and cheapened and exploited, and I wanted to try and find new ways as a feminist to be able to celebrate that," she says.It was her movement director who suggested she h...