News That Matters

Tag: plan

Mothercare UK administration plan threatens 2,500 jobs

Mothercare UK administration plan threatens 2,500 jobs

Business
Baby goods retailer Mothercare has said it plans to call in administrators to the troubled firm's UK business, putting 2,500 jobs at risk.Mothercare said its 79 UK stores were "not capable of returning to a level of structural profitability and returns that are sustainable for the group"."Furthermore, the company is unable to continue to satisfy the ongoing cash needs of Mothercare UK," it added.It said stores would continue to trade as normal for the time being.Also affected is Mothercare Business Services Limited (MBS), which provides certain services to Mothercare UK.'Necessary step'Mothercare has already gone through a company voluntary arrangement (CVA), which allowed it to shut 55 shops."These notices of intent to appoint administrators in respect o...
US election 2020: Elizabeth Warren sets out health funding plan

US election 2020: Elizabeth Warren sets out health funding plan

World
US presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren has offered details on funding for her healthcare plan, which is expected to cost the federal government $ 20.5tn (£15.8tn) over 10 years.She said the "Medicare for All" plan would not raise taxes "one penny" for ordinary Americans, but be largely paid for by businesses and the wealthy.Ms Warren is a Democratic front-runner in the 2020 race to the White House.She has faced criticism over lack of detail about her plan. Who will take on Trump in 2020? Can Sanders overhaul healthcare? So, what does her plan say?Ms Warren says her plan would not spend "any more money overall than we spend now", but the share spent by the federal government would increase to $ 20.5tn.It would mandate that employers pay the government th
Financial advisors need a succession plan to benefit clients and their own firm

Financial advisors need a succession plan to benefit clients and their own firm

Finance
kupicoo | E+ | Getty ImagesThe aging army of independent registered investment advisors who have spearheaded the growth of the financial planning profession need to follow their own advice when it comes to their businesses — for their clients' sake, as well as their own.With the average age of financial advisors somewhere in their mid-50s and a big bulge of advisors now in their 60s and 70s, the fate of thousands of practices and millions of clients in the next decade remains in doubt. Studies show that most small advisors — particularly solo practitioners — have no successor to fill their shoes, nor very good prospects for selling their business to someone else.The reality is, they probably never will."The No. 1 way that independent advisors exit the industry is through attrition," said