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Mars: Green glow detected on the Red Planet

Mars: Green glow detected on the Red Planet

Science
Scientists have identified a green light in the atmosphere of Mars.A similar glow is sometimes seen by astronauts on the space station when they look to the Earth's limb.The glow comes from oxygen atoms when they're excited by sunlight.The phenomenon has long been predicted to occur on other planets, but the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) - a joint European-Russian satellite at Mars - is the first to make the observation beyond Earth. "It's a nice result," said Dr Manish Patel from the UK's Open University. "You'd never plan a mission to go look for this kind of thing. Today, we have to be very clear about the science we're going to do before we get to Mars. But having got there, we thought, 'well, let's have a look'. And it worked."To ...
Mars: Mud flows on Red Planet behave like ‘boiling toothpaste’

Mars: Mud flows on Red Planet behave like ‘boiling toothpaste’

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device Scientists have made a surprising discovery about Mars by playing with muck in the laboratory. An international team of researchers wondered how volcanoes that spew mud instead of molten rock might look on the Red Planet compared with their counterparts here on Earth. In chamber experiments, simulated Martian mud flows were seen to behave a bit like boiling toothpaste. Under certain conditions, the fluid even began to bounce.The mucky gunge resembled a certain type of lava referred to as "pahoehoe", which is observed at Hawaii's famous Kīlauea volcano.The research results could now complicate some investigations at the Red Planet, believes study lead Dr Petr Brož from the Czech Academy of Sciences'
NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover to carry 10.9M names, 155 essays to Red Planet

NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover to carry 10.9M names, 155 essays to Red Planet

Science
March 27 (UPI) -- NASA's Mars Perseverance rover is set to carry the names of 10,932,295 people to the Red Planet. The names, etched onto tiny silicon chips by an electron beam, were recently attached to an aluminum plate on the rover at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The names scheduled to be carried into space next year were submitted by participants in NASA's "Send Your Name to Mars" campaign. Silicon chips featuring the essays of 155 finalists from NASA's "Name the Rover" contest were also affixed to the aluminum plate, which was mounted on the rover's aft crossbeam. The plate features an etched illustration of Mars and Earth linked by the rays of the sun. Earlier this week, engineers began configuring the rover for its ride on the Atlas V rocket. "Steps included stowing the roboti...
Climate change: Will planting millions of trees really save the planet?

Climate change: Will planting millions of trees really save the planet?

Science
From Greta Thunberg to Donald Trump and airlines to oil companies, everyone is suddenly going crazy for trees. The UK government has pledged to plant millions a year while other countries have schemes running into billions. But are these grand ambitions achievable? How much carbon dioxide do trees really pull in from the atmosphere? And what happens to a forest, planted amid a fanfare, over the following decades?How many will the UK plant?Last year's...
Life on Mars? Organic truffle molecules discovered on Red Planet

Life on Mars? Organic truffle molecules discovered on Red Planet

Technology
Organic molecules found on Earth in coal, crude oil, and white truffles have been discovered on Mars, suggesting the possible existence of early life on the planet.The thiophene molecules were probably produced through biological processes, rather than chemical ones, according to Washington State University astrobiologist Dirk Schulze-Makuch. The announcement comes as NASA's Curiosity rover captured its highest-resolution panorama of the Martian surface yet, composed of more than 1,000 images and 1.8 billion pixels. Image: A molecule found in white truffles has been discovered on Mars Alongside Jacob Heinz at the Technische Universitat in Berlin, Mr Schulze-Makuch explained his team's reasoning in a new paper published in the journal ...