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Tag: planet

New problems arise for crop storage as planet gets warmer

Technology
MECOSTA, Mich. -- For generations, Brian Sackett's family has farmed potatoes that are made into chips found on grocery shelves in much of the eastern U.S.About 25% of the nation's potato chips get their start in Michigan, where reliably cool air during September harvest and late spring has been ideal for crop storage. That's a big reason why the state produces more chipping potatoes than any other.But with temperatures edging higher, Sackett had to buy several small refrigeration units for his sprawling warehouses. Last year, he paid $ 125,000 for a bigger one. It's expensive to operate, but beats having his potatoes rot.“Our good, fresh, cool air is getting less all the time, it seems like,” he said on a recent morning as a front-end loader scooped up piles of plump, light-brown potatoe...
No cigar: Interstellar object is cookie-shaped planet shard

No cigar: Interstellar object is cookie-shaped planet shard

Technology
A new study says says our solar system's first known interstellar visitor is likely a remnant of a Pluto-like world and shaped like a cookieBy MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace WriterMarch 17, 2021, 9:23 PM• 4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Our solar system’s first known interstellar visitor is neither a comet nor asteroid as first suspected and looks nothing like a cigar. A new study says the mystery object is likely a remnant of a Pluto-like world and shaped like a cookie.Arizona State University astronomers reported this week that the strange 148-foot (45-meter) object that appears to be made of frozen nitrogen, just like the surface of Pluto and Neptune's largest moon Triton.The study's authors, Alan Jackson and Steven Desch, think an impact k...
Mars rover Perseverance makes first drive on Red Planet

Mars rover Perseverance makes first drive on Red Planet

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., March 5 (UPI) -- NASA's new Mars rover Perseverance made its first short drive on the Red Planet and took images of its own wheel marks in the Martian dust, agency engineers said Friday. The rover drove about 21 feet Thursday and used its steering function, performing better than it did on Earth said Anais Zarifian, a Perseverance mobility engineer for NASA, said in a news briefing. Advertisement "Our first drive went incredibly well," Zarifian said. "You can see the wheel tracks that we left on Mars. I don't think I've ever been happier to see wheel tracks that I've seen a lot." A quick test of my steering, and things are looking good as I get ready to roll. My team and I are keen to get moving. One step at a time. pic.twitter.com/XSYfT158AQ— NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover...
‘Red alert for our planet’: UN report warns governments ‘nowhere close’ to climate targets

‘Red alert for our planet’: UN report warns governments ‘nowhere close’ to climate targets

World
A UN climate change report has found that global efforts to reduce CO2 emissions "fall far short of what is required" and that nations must "step up" to fulfil promises made under the Paris agreement. In a stark warning ahead of a make or break COP26 climate conference in Glasgow later this year, countries were criticised over their emission reduction plans - known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) - and urged to make "more ambitious" commitments. Following a legally binding international treaty on climate change signed in Paris in 2015, almost 200 countries set a goal of limiting global temperature rise by 2C - or ideally 1.5C - by the end of the century. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player ...
Planet Mars is at its ‘biggest and brightest’

Planet Mars is at its ‘biggest and brightest’

Science
"But you don't have to wait until the middle of the night; even now, at nine or 10 o'clock in the evening, you'll easily see it over in the southeast," says astrophotographer, Damian Peach. "You can't miss it, it's the brightest star-like object in that part of the sky," he told BBC News.Let's block ads! (Why?) BBC News - Science & Environment