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Tag: planetary

Radio telescope measures aurorae in distant planetary system

Radio telescope measures aurorae in distant planetary system

Science
Feb. 18 (UPI) -- With the help of a powerful radio telescope in the Netherlands, scientists have developed a new way to study the environment around exoplanets. Using the Low Frequency Array radio telescope, scientists for the first time detected and analyzed radio emissions produced by interactions between a star and one of its planets. Scientists used observations captured by the HARPS-N telescope in Spain to confirm the emissions weren't caused by interactions between the star and a stellar companion. The radio signatures detected by the LOFAR telescope are similar to the electromagnetic signatures produced by an aurora on Earth. The research, described this week in both Nature Astronomy and Astrophysical Journal Letters, focused on red dwarfs. In addition to being the most abundant ...
Collision that formed the moon also brought Earth water, planetary scientists claim

Collision that formed the moon also brought Earth water, planetary scientists claim

Science
May 21 (UPI) -- Without the moon and water, life on Earth wouldn't be possible. New research out of Germany suggests both were delivered by Theia, which collided with Earth 4.4 billion years ago. Scientists have long puzzled over the origins of Earth's water. Earth was formed in the inner solar system, and the inner solar system was dry. The solar system's wet materials were relegated to the outer solar system. Water-rich carbonaceous meteorites, for example, hail from the outer solar system. Non-carbonaceous meteorites from the inner solar system are without water. At some point during Earth's early history, carbonaceous materials delivered large quantities of water. But the details and timing of this delivery process aren't well understood. "We have used molybdenum isotopes to answer ...
Astronomers think 'winking' star is consuming cloud of planetary debris

Astronomers think 'winking' star is consuming cloud of planetary debris

Science
Dec. 22 (UPI) -- New data suggests a unique 'winking' star located 550 light-years from Earth is consuming remnants of wrecked planets.Astronomers believe the periodic dimming of RZ Piscium, a star found in the constellation Pisces, is caused by a giant orbiting cloud of dust formed by the debris of one or more disintegrating planets.Normally, the large discs of dust and debris found around young stars disperse after a few million years. But RZ Piscium is between 30 million and 50 million years old and the dimming episodes persist, sometimes last a couple of days."I've been studying young stars near Earth for 20 years and I've never seen anything like this one," Benjamin Zuckerman, a professor of astronomy at UCLA, said in a news release. "Most sun-like stars have lost their planet-forming...