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Citigroup plans to boost pay this year to address inequality among female and minority workers

Citigroup plans to boost pay this year to address inequality among female and minority workers

Finance
Citigroup will increase compensation for women and minorities to bridge pay gaps in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Germany, as part of its annual pay process this year, the Wall Street bank said on Monday.Citi said it had conducted a survey in the three countries, where it found that women and minorities are paid slightly less than men and non-minorities, respectively.Compensation would be raised based on the pay gaps identified in the survey, Citi spokeswoman Jennifer Lowney said.Citi, along with other U.S. banks and credit card companies, had been under investor pressure to disclose the gender pay gap.The company's activist investor Arjuna Capital asked Citi's shareholders last year to vote in favor of a proposal requiring the bank to address the gender pay gap."Women are pai...
Scientists publish 3D-printing plans for 200-million-year-old dinosaur skull

Scientists publish 3D-printing plans for 200-million-year-old dinosaur skull

Science
Jan. 12 (UPI) -- Anyone with access to a 3D printer can now create a replica of a 200-million-year-old dinosaur skull.Scientists at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, used advanced CT scanning technology to image and digitally reconstruct -- bone by bone -- a detailed 3D model of the skull of Massospondylus, a sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic.The researchers published their rendering of the ancient dino skull this week in the journal PeerJ."This means any researcher or member of the public can print their own Massospondylus skull at home," Kimi Chapelle, a PhD student at the Evolutionary Studies Institute at Wits, said in a news release.Massospondylus is one of the most famous dinosaurs in South Africa. Its fossil record is rich. But the lates...
Budget 2017: Plans to build 300,000 homes a year

Budget 2017: Plans to build 300,000 homes a year

Business
Media playback is unsupported on your devicePhilip Hammond says next week's Budget will set out how the government will build 300,000 new homes a year.But the chancellor said there was no "single magic bullet" to increase housing supply and the government would not simply "pour money in".Ministers want to speed up developments where planning permission has been granted and give more help to small building firms, he added.Labour says ministers "still have no plan to fix the housing crisis".Speaking on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show ahead of Wednesday's Budget, the chancellor also said: "There are no unemployed people" while discussing the threat to jobs posed by technological change - when pressed later, he said the government hadn't forgotten the 1.4m who are unemployedThe government was "on t...
Vauxhall plans 400 job cuts at Ellesmere Port as sales fall

Vauxhall plans 400 job cuts at Ellesmere Port as sales fall

Business
Vauxhall is cutting about 400 jobs at its Ellesmere Port car plant due to falling sales.The carmaker, now owned by France's PSA Group - maker of Peugeot and Citroen - is "facing challenging European market conditions," a spokesman said.Ellesmere Port, which makes the Astra models, will move staff from two production shifts to one in early 2018.PSA said that manufacturing costs at Ellesmere were higher than other "benchmark plants" in the group.Vauxhall employs about 4,500 people in the UK, with about 1,800 at Ellesmere Port. The company also has a factory at Luton, which makes vans.PSA became Europe's second biggest carmaker after Volkswagen in August when it completed the purchase of Vauxhall and German brand Opel from US car giant General Motors.UK Prime Minister Theresa May personally s...
WTO countries fret over Brexit plans

WTO countries fret over Brexit plans

Business
The UK and EU have formally set out plans for World Trade Organization commitments post-Brexit, but they have already been opposed by some countries.The issue is about how much of certain goods can be imported at reduced tariffs after Brexit. These quotas currently apply to imports anywhere in the EU.But seven nations, including the US and Canada, have already made it clear that they think plans to divide existing quotas will put them at a disadvantage.After Brexit, exporters of goods will need to know what access they can expect to the separate markets of the UK and EU. The dissenting nations object to proposals from London and Brussels about how they plan to handle access to their markets for about 100 mainly agricultural goods. They feel that proposals for dividing quotas for goods impo...