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Tag: plastic

Plastic threads found in oysters, clams along Oregon coast

Plastic threads found in oysters, clams along Oregon coast

Science
Nov. 12 (UPI) -- Microplastics are showing up inside clams and oysters on the coast of the Pacific Northwest. New research out of Oregon suggests the majority of the pollution inside bivalves is comprised of microthreads. Synthetic threads are used in a variety of products, but they're especially common in pieces of recreational clothing -- fleece jackets, yoga pants and other forms of outerwear and athletic gear. "These microfilaments can be shed from clothing, up to 700,000 per load of laundry," Britta Baechler, a doctoral student at Portland State University in Oregon, said in a news release. "Those particles then travel out through greywater into wastewater and to the coast." For the new study, published this week in the journal Limnology and Oceanography Letters, scientists collecte...
How plastic bags were supposed to help save the planet

How plastic bags were supposed to help save the planet

Science
The plastic carrier bag has become something of a symbol for the problems caused by plastic pollution.But according to the family of the man who created it, Sten Gustaf Thulin, his design was supposed to help the planet and he'd be shocked and upset to see what it's become.The Thulin family make no money from the sale of the bags.BBC Environment Reporter Laura Foster explains what was supposed to happen and why paper and cotton bags can actually be worse for the environment than plastic ones that are recycled.Let's block ads! (Why?) BBC News - Science & Environment
Microplastics: Seeking the ‘plastic score’ of the food on our plates

Microplastics: Seeking the ‘plastic score’ of the food on our plates

Science
Microplastics are found everywhere on Earth, yet we know surprisingly little about what risks they pose to living things. Scientists are now racing to investigate some of the big unanswered questions.Daniella Hodgson is digging a hole in the sand on a windswept beach as seabirds wheel overhead. "Found one," she cries, flinging down her spade.She opens her hand to reveal a wriggling lugworm. Plucked from its underground burrow, this humble creature is not unlike the proverbial canary in a coal mine.A sentinel for plastic, the worm will ingest any particles of plastic it comes across while swallowing sand, which can then pass up the food chain to birds and fish."We want to see how much plastic the island is potentially getting on i...
Unilever to cut plastic use to appeal to Gen Z

Unilever to cut plastic use to appeal to Gen Z

Business
Media playback is unsupported on your device Unilever, which owns brands such as Surf and PG Tips, says it plans to halve the amount of new plastic it uses in a bid to appeal to younger shoppers.The firm is responsible for producing 700,000 tonnes of new plastic a year.But Unilever plans to slash that figure over the next five years by using more recycled plastic and finding other alternative materials.Nevertheless, Unilever boss, Alan Jope, holds that plastic is a "terrific material".And he maintains that many of the alternatives are worse, saying: "A hysterical move to glass may be trendy but it would have a dreadful impact on the carbon footprint of packaging." Why is plastic a problem? Plastic or paper: Which bag is greener? In an intervie...