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Survey: Majority don't use prescribed epinephrine in emergency

Survey: Majority don't use prescribed epinephrine in emergency

Health
June 21 (UPI) -- A majority of people with potentially life-threatening allergies don't use their epinephrine auto-injectors in an emergency, according to a study. The results are based upon surveys of 917 people, including 450 adults. The findings were published Thursday in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. More than 50 million Americans experience various types of allergies each year, including 4.2 million children with food allergies. Other allergic reactions are to medication, latex and/or insect stings. Although 89 percent of the adults surveyed said they filled their prescriptions, 45 percent said they didn't have their device during their most severe allergic reaction -- despite having had previous medical emergencies. Seventy-eight person said they had been hospitaliz...
Gosport hospital deaths: Prescribed painkillers 'shortened 456 lives'

Gosport hospital deaths: Prescribed painkillers 'shortened 456 lives'

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device More than 450 patients died after being given powerful painkillers inappropriately at Gosport War Memorial Hospital, a report has found.An independent panel said, taking into account missing records, a further 200 patients may have suffered a similar fate.The report found there was a "disregard for human life" of a large number of patients from 1989 to 2000.It said Dr Jane Barton oversaw the practice of prescribing on the wards.There was an "institutionalised regime" of prescribing and administering "dangerous" amounts of a medication not clinically justified at the Hampshire hospital, the report said.Prime Minister Theresa May described events at Gosport as "deeply troubling" and apologised to fami...
Back pain patients with depression often prescribed opioids

Back pain patients with depression often prescribed opioids

Health
WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 -- Patients with low back pain who are depressed are more likely to be prescribed opioids, and to be prescribed higher doses, a new study finds.Low back pain is a leading cause of disability in the United States and the most common reason for opioid prescriptions, the researchers said."There is strong evidence that depressed patients are at greater risk for misuse and overdose of opioids," said study senior author Dr. John Markman. He directs the University of Rochester Medical Center's Translational Pain Research Program, in New York.The analysis of nationwide data on nearly 5,400 people from 2004 to 2009 found that patients with back pain who screened positive for depression were more than twice as likely to be prescribed an opioid painkiller. Over a year's time,...