News That Matters

Tag: privacy

If you win the $868 million Mega Millions jackpot, here's how to maintain some privacy

If you win the $868 million Mega Millions jackpot, here's how to maintain some privacy

Finance
With the Mega Millions jackpot at a whopping $ 868 million, wannabe winners might be pondering how it would feel to come into an amount that's larger than the entire economy of some small countries. They also should consider how they'd keep their sudden windfall under wraps. While a winner's instinct might be to shout from the rooftops, experts say that one of the best ways to protect your newfound wealth is to avoid letting too many people know about it. Unfortunately, it isn't always easy to do. While some states allow winners to easily remain anonymous, others do not. And in some states, as long as you plan ahead, you can ...
Facebook Portal video chat screens raise privacy concerns

Facebook Portal video chat screens raise privacy concerns

Technology
Media playback is unsupported on your device Facebook is launching two video call machines for the home in the midst of its latest data breach scandal.The Portal products automatically zoom in on users and follow them as they move, to offer a superior experience to existing smartphone and tablet apps.The devices rely on Facebook Messenger to make and receive calls and also feature Amazon's Alexa smart assistant.But consumers may have privacy concerns and a rival device-maker suggested the very concept was "tech clutter". "It's staggeringly unfortunate timing," commented Jeremy White, product editor at Wired UK magazine."News of the accounts being hacked broke the day before [Facebook'...
Another email about privacy and data? Here's why

Another email about privacy and data? Here's why

Technology
"Updates to our privacy policy", "Stay connected", "Data law changes": You have probably had lots of these emails recently from various companies and organisations - but what's it all about? It's to do with a huge shake-up of data protection laws, with a tougher European standard soon kicking in and companies worried about the potential for huge fines.The EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) means many groups who currently send you emails need to confirm you consent to them using your personal details.For example, if you are still okay to receive marketing information and promotions.It means consent can no longer be assumed. Pre-ticked boxes that you have to uncheck are now banned; as is hiding consent in the middle of long chunks of legal text.Some companies who ...
Data firm at center of Facebook privacy scandal will close

Data firm at center of Facebook privacy scandal will close

Technology
Cambridge Analytica, the Trump-affiliated data firm at the center of Facebook's worst privacy scandal in history, is declaring bankruptcy and shutting down. The London firm blamed "unfairly negative media coverage" and said it has been "vilified" for actions it says are both legal and widely accepted as part of online advertising. Cambridge Analytica said it has filed papers to begin insolvency proceedings in the U.K. and will seek bankruptcy protection in a federal court in New York. "The siege of media coverage has driven away virtually all of the company's customers and suppliers," Cambridge Analytica said in a statement. "As a result, it has been determined that it is no longer viable to continue operating the business." Facebook said it will keep looking into data misuse by Cambridge...
How to handle the flood of GDPR privacy updates

How to handle the flood of GDPR privacy updates

Technology
Many app users' inboxes are bulging with requests to review new terms of service and privacy conditions.And it is no coincidence that so many developers have revamped their small print at the same time.In just under a month, the EU will introduce a new privacy law that gives Europeans new data protection rights and threatens giant fines for organisations that do not comply.But making sense of the new terms poses a challenge.Some companies, including Facebook, are asking members to give explicit consent to new features such as facial recognition.Others - such as Twitter, Fitbit and Yahoo - have told members that simply continuing to use their products will be interpreted as agreement to the tweaked conditions.The time-strapped public would be forgiven for thinking the easiest thing to do is...