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Tag: privacy

Another email about privacy and data? Here's why

Another email about privacy and data? Here's why

Technology
"Updates to our privacy policy", "Stay connected", "Data law changes": You have probably had lots of these emails recently from various companies and organisations - but what's it all about? It's to do with a huge shake-up of data protection laws, with a tougher European standard soon kicking in and companies worried about the potential for huge fines.The EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) means many groups who currently send you emails need to confirm you consent to them using your personal details.For example, if you are still okay to receive marketing information and promotions.It means consent can no longer be assumed. Pre-ticked boxes that you have to uncheck are now banned; as is hiding consent in the middle of long chunks of legal text.Some companies who ...
Data firm at center of Facebook privacy scandal will close

Data firm at center of Facebook privacy scandal will close

Technology
Cambridge Analytica, the Trump-affiliated data firm at the center of Facebook's worst privacy scandal in history, is declaring bankruptcy and shutting down. The London firm blamed "unfairly negative media coverage" and said it has been "vilified" for actions it says are both legal and widely accepted as part of online advertising. Cambridge Analytica said it has filed papers to begin insolvency proceedings in the U.K. and will seek bankruptcy protection in a federal court in New York. "The siege of media coverage has driven away virtually all of the company's customers and suppliers," Cambridge Analytica said in a statement. "As a result, it has been determined that it is no longer viable to continue operating the business." Facebook said it will keep looking into data misuse by Cambridge...
How to handle the flood of GDPR privacy updates

How to handle the flood of GDPR privacy updates

Technology
Many app users' inboxes are bulging with requests to review new terms of service and privacy conditions.And it is no coincidence that so many developers have revamped their small print at the same time.In just under a month, the EU will introduce a new privacy law that gives Europeans new data protection rights and threatens giant fines for organisations that do not comply.But making sense of the new terms poses a challenge.Some companies, including Facebook, are asking members to give explicit consent to new features such as facial recognition.Others - such as Twitter, Fitbit and Yahoo - have told members that simply continuing to use their products will be interpreted as agreement to the tweaked conditions.The time-strapped public would be forgiven for thinking the easiest thing to do is...
New 'phone boxes' spark privacy concerns

New 'phone boxes' spark privacy concerns

Technology
If you live in London or Leeds, you may have already spotted one on a street corner near you.At just under three metres tall, and with two large LCD advertising displays, the imposing aluminium structures are hard to miss. They're called InLinks and are billed as the payphone for the smartphone generation.Behind the shiny facade are four powerful computers, allowing the InLinks to offer calls, ultrafast WiFi and USB charging. All for free - paid for by advertising."It's intentionally not like any other phone box," explained Matt Bird, general manager of InLinkUK. "There's no box, no door - because they're no longer needed. And we've designed it to be modular, so we can keep chopping and changing the technology that's inside."Image:The 100th InLink was installed in Wandsworth, southwest Lon...
Facebook to exclude billions from European privacy laws

Facebook to exclude billions from European privacy laws

Technology
Facebook has changed its terms of service, meaning 1.5 billion members will not be protected under tough new privacy protections coming to Europe.The move comes as the firm faces a series of questions from lawmakers and regulators around the world over its handling of personal data.The change revolves around which users will be regulated via its European headquarters in Ireland. Facebook said it planned clearer privacy rules worldwide.The move, reported by Reuters, will see Facebook users outside the EU governed by Facebook Inc in the US rather than Facebook Ireland.It is widely seen as a way of the social network avoiding having to apply the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to countries outside the EU.The change will affect more than 70% of its more than two billion memb...