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Tag: Prostate

Study: One-third of prostate cancer tumors in Black men have dangerous gene mutations

Study: One-third of prostate cancer tumors in Black men have dangerous gene mutations

Health
Oct. 28 (UPI) -- More than one-third of Black men with prostate cancer carry potentially dangerous genetic mutations that cause more severe disease, an analysis published Wednesday by the journal Molecular Cancer Research found. Researchers sequenced 39 genes of interest in prostate cancer tumors and matched normal tissue from 77 Black-American men with prostate cancer, finding that roughly 35% of patients' tumors harbored potentially damaging mutations in several genes. Advertisement "Our research suggests that there may be key genetic differences in the prostate tumors of individuals who belong to different race groups," study co-author Jianfeng Xu told UPI. "This could impact the way their cancer progresses and the treatment options available to them." "And we found that certain mutati...
HPV might cause 1 in 5 cases of prostate cancer, analysis says

HPV might cause 1 in 5 cases of prostate cancer, analysis says

Health
July 13 (UPI) -- Just over 20 percent of men with prostate cancer tested positive for the human papilloma viruses, or HPVs, an analysis published Monday in the journal Infectious Agents and Cancer found. The link suggests the viruses might be among the causes of a cancer that kills an estimated 30,000 American men each year, supporting the case for universal vaccination, the researchers said. Advertisement "The data may indicate that HPV infection may be transmitted during sexual activity and play causal role in prostate cancer, as well as cervical cancer [in women]," co-author James Lawson, a professor at the University of New South Wales in Australia, said in a statement. "Although HPVs are only one of many pathogens that have been identified in prostate cancer, they are the only infe...
Increased prostate cancer risk linked to higher dairy consumption

Increased prostate cancer risk linked to higher dairy consumption

Health
Oct. 21 (UPI) -- High consumption of dairy appears linked to higher prostate cancer risk, a new study said. Mayo Clinic researchers report in a new study, published Monday in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, that prior research has shown prostate cancer risk is higher in Western countries which rely on dairy as the main source of calcium compared to Asian countries. Instead of dairy products, Asian countries rely on higher amounts of plant-based foods, which have previously been associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, researchers say. The new study is the latest to suggest dairy consumption has an affect on cancer risk, following a call from a doctors group earlier this month to add warnings to cheese because of research suggesting it can increase breast cance...
Prostate cancer screening scan hope

Prostate cancer screening scan hope

Health
Hundreds of UK men are trying out a new screening test for prostate cancer to see if it should eventually be offered routinely on the NHS. The test is a non-invasive MRI scan that takes images of the inside of the body to check for any abnormal growths. Scientists running the trial say it will take a few years to know if MRI will be better than available blood tests and biopsies at spotting cancers. NHS England said it would review this "potentially exciting" development.Why don't we already screen for prostate cancer?The UK currently doesn't offer routine screening because there is no reliable test. A blood test, called PSA, can check for high levels of a protein that can sometimes indicate that the person might have prostate cancer, but it is not always...
YouTube videos about prostate cancer putting patients at risk – study

YouTube videos about prostate cancer putting patients at risk – study

Technology
YouTube videos about prostate cancer are putting patients at risk of harm because of misleading medical information, a team of researchers has claimed. Scientists from the NYU School of Medicine analysed the 150 most-viewed YouTube videos on the disease and reported that 77% had factual errors or biased content in either the video or the comments section.Their work, published in the journal European Urology, found that while 75% of the videos fully described the benefits of different treatments, only 53% warned of their side effects.According to the team, 19% of the videos also recommended alternative and unproven medicines - some of which could directly harm patients.One video promoted "injecting herbs" into the prostate to treat cancer.The researchers said the audiences f...