News That Matters

Tag: protect

Russia: We will protect our troops in Syria

Russia: We will protect our troops in Syria

World
Russia has told Sky News it will protect its people on the ground in Syria if missiles are launched by the US and its allies.Maria Zakharova, spokeswoman for the Russian foreign ministry, said Donald Trump's threat to launch missiles at Syrian forces was a "test for each and every country (with troops in Syria) to protect its people on the ground".Russia and Iran are the Assad regime's allies in the Syrian civil war.The Kremlin said on Wednesday that the US and its allies - France, Germany and the UK - should "seriously consider" the consequences of their threats to launch military action in response to an alleged chemical attack carried out on Saturday in Douma, eastern Ghouta, on the outskirts of Damascus.Image:Maria Zakharova spoke to Sky News in MoscowMs Zakharova told Sky News present...
Sky Bet failed to protect vulnerable customers, says watchdog

Sky Bet failed to protect vulnerable customers, says watchdog

Business
Sky Bet is to pay £1m for "failing to protect vulnerable customers", the Gambling Commission has said.It did not stop problem gamblers even after they had asked to be banned from its websites, the watchdog said.Sky Bet chief executive Richard Flint said the firm accepted that it "needed to do more" to stop self-excluded gamblers from opening duplicate accounts.He added that Sky Bet had tried to return the money that was gambled.People who feel they are having trouble controlling their gambling can ask betting firms to refuse their service.But 736 self-excluded Sky Bet customers were able to open and use duplicate accounts, the Gambling Commission said.In addition, about 50,000 people who had excluded themselves received marketing emails, texts or push notifications through a mobile app. An
It's not up to clients to protect themselves from irrationality: Advisor

It's not up to clients to protect themselves from irrationality: Advisor

Finance
Recent stock market swings in and out of correction territory despite overall good economic news have reminded investors that such wild volatility is always a possibility. While experienced financial professionals generally take such developments in stride, how can their clients protect themselves from their own emotional reactions?The best way to avoid irrational decisions as an investor is to turn off the financial news, said certified financial planner Rick Waechter, founder of Old Peak Finance."Investing requires a long-term view," he said. "The news is by definition short-term, and there is no way to reconcile them," he said.Waechter said that, at most, investors should look at their accounts monthly — and preferably less often. "Every six to 12 months, consider rebalancing ... to get
Why the flu shot this year may not protect you

Why the flu shot this year may not protect you

Health
The upcoming flu season may be a particularly severe one in the U.S., some medical experts warned today, citing preliminary data from Australia, where the flu season is waning. The flu vaccine used this year in Australia — which has the same composition as the vaccine used in the U.S. — was only 10 percent effective, according to a preliminary estimate, at preventing the strain of the virus that predominantly circulated during the country's flu season,an international team of medical experts wrote in a perspective published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. "However imperfect, though, current influenza vaccines remain a valuable public health tool, and it is always better to get vaccinated than not to get vaccinated," the team emphasized. The researchers suggested that the
Scientists propose space shield to protect Earth from solar storms

Scientists propose space shield to protect Earth from solar storms

Science
Oct. 6 (UPI) -- If governments and their space agencies are serious about protecting Earth from solar storms, one team of researchers argues a giant space shield is the most logical solution.Much attention is paid to the threat of comets and asteroids. In the past, violent collisions have triggered mass extinctions. Solar storms -- intense waves of high energy particles flung into space during coronal mass ejection -- aren't so much a threat to life. But they could seriously damage satellites, electric grids, communications systems and a variety of modern technologies.When a massive geomagnetic solar storm struck Earth in 1859, the only observable effect was a spate of vibrant auroras. If a similarly powerful storm hit Earth today, the global economy could suffer losses totaling in the tri...