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Ancient skull provides earliest evidence of modern humans in Mongolia

Ancient skull provides earliest evidence of modern humans in Mongolia

Science
Jan. 30 (UPI) -- An ancient Mongolian skull thought to belong to the a unique species of Pleistocene hominin, dubbed Mongolanthropus, is actually the earliest evidence of modern humans in the region. Using radiocarbon dating and DNA analysis, paleontologists determined the skull belonged to Homo sapiens. The discovery is described in a new paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications. As a result of compromised dating efforts and the fossil's archaic skull features, some researchers previously hypothesized the hominid remains hailed from the mid to late Pleistocene and belonged to Homo erectus or the Neanderthals. The new analysis posits that the modern human specimen lived sometime between 34,950 and 33,900 years ago. Because the skull is contaminated with a variety of...
Watch: Huntington Prep's Jimma Gatwech provides high school dunk of season

Watch: Huntington Prep's Jimma Gatwech provides high school dunk of season

Sports
Jan. 5 (UPI) -- Huntington Prep junior guard Jimma Gatwech provided one of the best dunks of the high school basketball season in a win over Blue Ridge School. Gatwech's slam came in the second quarter of the Irish's 66-61 win against the Barons on Friday in Floyd County, Va. Gatwech stole the ball from Blue Ridge and broke out in the open court. He sprinted coast-to-coast before reaching the paint. Gatwech put the ball on the floor with his right hand before picking it up with both hands. He then jumped and threw the ball behind his back before putting it back in his right hand for a powerful finish. This is far from the first time Gatwech has taken flight for a complicated dunk. He also went aerial in December while playing against Our Savior New American for one of his many high-flying...
Jurassic fossil tail provides missing link in ancient crocodile family tree

Jurassic fossil tail provides missing link in ancient crocodile family tree

Science
May 11 (UPI) -- Paleontologists have recovered a Jurassic fossil tail they believe is the missing link between two halves of the ancient crocodile family. During the Jurassic period, from roughly 200 to 145 million years ago, ancient crocodiles took two basic forms, each featuring several species. One group featured dino-like armor and had limbs for walking on land. Another had tail fins and flippers, but not armor. One group was croc-like, the other was dolphin-like. Researchers suggest the newly discovered tail belonged to an intermediary species, which boasted armor as well as tail fins. Scientists, who described the fossil in the journal PeerJ, named the new species Magyarosuchus fitosi, a tribute to Attila Fitos, the amateur collector who discovered it. Fitos dug up the tail in the ...
Blockbuster movie Black Panther provides these 4 valuable money lessons

Blockbuster movie Black Panther provides these 4 valuable money lessons

Finance
"A man who has not prepared his children for his death has failed as a father."When I watched King T'Chaka's declaration to his son, T'Challa, in Disney-Marvel's box-office hit Black Panther, the Dora Milaje warrior spirit in me surfaced and brought forth my financial planner's spear!This mystical, ancestral scene piqued my curiosity regarding how King T'Chaka's legacy would unfold in T'Challa's reign as the new king of Wakanda.Preparing the next generation for leadership includes guidance on managing resources and wealth. This lesson is gender neutral despite the gender-specific reference made by King T'Chaka. In another poignant scene T'Challa's mother, Queen Ramonda, also affirmed the parental and community influence in grooming T'Challa for his ascension to the throne.The state of affa...
Salamander genome provides clues to the amphibian's regenerative abilities

Salamander genome provides clues to the amphibian's regenerative abilities

Science
Dec. 22 (UPI) -- Scientists have for the first time sequenced the entire genome of the Iberian ribbed newt. Their efforts revealed a unique family of genes important to the salamander's impressive regenerative abilities.The Iberian ribbed newt, Pleurodeles waltl, maxes out at a foot in length, but the amphibian boasts a massive genome -- six times larger than the human genome.The sequencing of the giant genome by scientists at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden revealed numerous copies of a microRNA group typically found in mammalian stem cells and tumor cells. Researchers believe this unique group is key to the salamander's ability to regenerate brain neurons and other parts of its body."It will be exciting to figure out how regeneration in the adult organism re-activates embryonic genes...