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First CO2 rise in four years puts pressure on Paris targets

First CO2 rise in four years puts pressure on Paris targets

Science
Global emissions of CO2 in 2017 are projected to rise for the first time in four years, dashing hopes that a peak might soon be reached. The main cause of the expected growth has been greater use of coal in China as its economy expanded. Researchers are uncertain if the rise in emissions is a one-off or the start of a new period of CO2 build-up.Scientists say that a global peak in CO2 before 2020 is needed to limit dangerous global warming this century.The Global Carbon Project has been analysing and reporting on the scale of emissions of CO2 since 2006. Carbon output has grown by about 3% per year in that period, but growth essentially declined or remained flat between 2014 and 2016.The latest figures indicate that in 2017, emissions of CO2 from all human activities grew by about 2% globa...
Rafael Nadal: US Open champion puts resurgence down to 'passion' for tennis

Rafael Nadal: US Open champion puts resurgence down to 'passion' for tennis

Sports
Rafael Nadal put his remarkable resurgence down to his "love for the game" after claiming a 16th Grand Slam title at the US Open.The 31-year-old Spaniard beat South Africa's Kevin Anderson 6-3 6-3 6-4 to win his third title in New York.Following his French Open success in June, it is the first time since 2013 that Nadal has won two Slams in a year."I wake up every morning with the passion to go on court and to try to improve things," he said."I still want to compete and still feel the nerves every time that I go on court. While that keeps happening, I will be here."When some day arrives that I don't feel the nerves or that extra passion for the game that I feel, it will be the day to say, 'OK, I do another thing.'"I am 31, I'm not 25, but I still have the passion and the love for the game....
Burning policy puts pressure on recycling targets

Burning policy puts pressure on recycling targets

Science
A boom in incinerator-building could make it impossible for the UK to meet future targets for recycling, a report says.The consultancy Eunomia says waste companies constructing new incinerators will need waste to feed them.And that could reduce Britain’s stated ambition to recycle more waste.A government spokesman said "great progress" had been made in boosting recycling rates.But Eunomia’s report says current trends in building incinerators will make a mockery of the ambition of Environment Secretary Michael Gove to achieve a “green Brexit”.Recycling successSince 2009/10, it says, the UK has more than doubled its capacity for burning what is known as residual waste – what is left over after recycling.Capacity to burn it has risen from 6.3 million tonnes to 13.5 million tonnes.But over the